Tag Archives: featured

Continuum – A Photography Book by Abelardo Morell, Alyssa McDonald and Irina Rozovsky

Continuum is the second Yoffy Press Triptych after TRACE was published in late 2018 (reviewed in F-Stop Magazine here), and features the work of Abelardo Morell, Alyssa McDonald and Irina Rozovsky. In each Triptych, three artists are given a word to inspire the creation of a small book of work. The three resulting books are sold as a set, inviting the viewer into the collaboration to make connections between the projects and the overarching theme.

I recently heard a photographer speaking with his former professor/mentor in a podcast interview (check out Ffoton Interviews from Ffoton Wales), and the photographer specifically mentioned the impact made on him by the way lectures were structured and the influences introduced throughout the course. He also made a point to mention that work by certain photographers was included in the lectures, and unless otherwise he may have never learned about them; which made a big impact. The decisions made by the professor were lasting and altering for this student in the decades to follow. Personally, I can trace back many of my photo influences through my former professors and mentors.   

If one studies the history of photography, or even skims an anthology of famous photographers of the 20th century, it’s not hard to trace the traveling impact of Strand to Steiglitz, to Evans, to Parks, to Winogrand, to Metzner, to Leibovitz, to Gilden…and so on. Just pick a starting point and follow the breadcrumbs. The path of influence could lead in a number of different directions from any number of different artists; but the core idea remains. Photographers don’t create work in a vacuum. In the triptych Continuum, the impact of these three photographers upon each other, Morell, McDonald, and Rozovsky, gives the viewer an opportunity to explore the similarities and differences across their work. Whether it is subtle or direct, the lasting impact can be immeasurable.

To their credit, Yoffy Press has taken the triptych format of publishing in interesting directions. Continuum is another wonderful way for a publisher of photo books to explore themes that are not easily explored. Continuum leads us in a circle of influence asking the viewer to reflect upon the work of these three photographers, and it also invited me to reflect on the influences I had as a photo student and beyond. The three books examine the relationship between student and teacher and how that dynamic can shift, reverse and fuse over time. Abelardo Morell taught at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design for more than thirty years. Irina Rozovsky was his student there and became a teacher herself.  Alyssa McDonald became Irina Rozovsky’s student, and later became Abelardo Morell’s assistant.  Continuum brings these three photographers together in a way for the viewer to discover the different ways they learned from each other.  This continuum is one of many lineages in the unending and ever-changing collective evolution of photography.

© Abelardo Morell, from Continuum by Yoffy Press
© Abelardo Morell, from Continuum by Yoffy Press
© Abelardo Morell, from Continuum by Yoffy Press

About Abelardo Morell

Abelardo Morell was born in Havana, Cuba in 1948. He immigrated to the United States with his parents in 1962.  Morell received his undergraduate degree from Bowdoin College and his MFA from The Yale University School of Art. He has received an honorary degree from Bowdoin College in 1997 and from Lesley University in 2014.

His recent publications include The Universe Next Door (2013), published by The Art Institute of Chicago, and Tent-Camera (2018), published by Nazraeli Press.  His most recent body of work, Flowers for Lisa, was published by Abrams in October 2018.

He has received a number of awards and grants, which include a Guggenheim fellowship in 1994 and an Infinity Award in Art from ICP in 2011. In November 2017, he received a Lucie Award for achievement in fine art.

His work has been collected and shown in many galleries, institutions and museums, including the Museum of Modern Art, The Whitney Museum of American Art, the Metropolitan Art Museum in New York, The Chicago Art Institute, The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, The Houston Museum of Art, The Boston Museum of Fine Art, The Victoria & Albert Museum and over seventy other museums in the United States and abroad. A retrospective of his work organized jointly by the Art Institute of Chicago, The Getty in Los Angeles and The High Museum in Atlanta closed in May 2014 after a year of travel. This November of 2019, he will have a show of his work Flowers for Lisa on display at Edwynn Houk Gallery in New York City.

www.abelardomorell.net

© Alyssa McDonald, from Continuum by Yoffy Press
© Alyssa McDonald, from Continuum by Yoffy Press
© Alyssa McDonald, from Continuum by Yoffy Press

About Alyssa McDonald

Alyssa McDonald is a New England native and photographic artist based in Boston. She graduated with honors from Massachusetts College of Art and Design with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Photography. Most recently, she has exhibited her photographs in group shows at ROW DTLA for the Lucie Foundation’s Month of Photography Los Angeles, SE Center for Photography in Greenville, South Carolina and Millepiani Exhibition Space in Rome, Italy, Aviary Gallery in Boston, Massachusetts and Dehn Gallery in Manchester, Connecticut.  She has work in three upcoming shows in 2019 including a group exhibition at the Rhode Island Photographic Arts Center in Providence, Rhode Island, The Cumberland Valley Photographers Exhibition at the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts in Hagerstown, Maryland and Women Photographers Today at Valid Photo in Barcelona, Spain.  She was part of Photolucida’s Critical Mass Top 200 and received an honorable mention in the 12th Annual Julia Margaret Cameron Awards.

Her photographs are rooted in a realm that is capable of being both physical and psychological.  It is through her intense observation of landscapes and characters over the course of the seasons and passing of years, that her subject matter is able to parallel the immediate with the infinite.  Each composition is laden with the history of its landscape and steeped with  experiences of wonder and discovery in the natural world.  With these symbolic values and narratives in mind, she aims her camera at intertwined histories, origins and fates.

www.alyssanmcdonald.com

© Irina Rozovsky, from Continuum by Yoffy Press
© Irina Rozovsky, from Continuum by Yoffy Press
© Irina Rozovsky, from Continuum by Yoffy Press

About Irina Rozovsky

Irina Rozovsky (born in Moscow, raised in the US), makes photographs of people and places, transforming external landscapes into interior states. She has published two monographs (One to Nothing, 2011, and Island in my Mind, 2015). Her work is exhibited internationally and is in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and has appeared in The New Yorker, New York Times Magazine, Harpers, and Vice. Irina lives and works in Athens, Georgia where she and her husband Mark Steinmetz run the photography project space The Humid. Irina is represented by Claxton Projects.


www.irinar.com


 

Continuum – Abelardo Morell, Alyssa McDonald and Irina Rozovsky
Published by Yoffy Press
Softcover, set of three books
8.75 x 6 inches – each book is approx. 40 pages
Edition of 250


Yoffy Press was founded by Jennifer Yoffy. She founded Crusade for Art in 2013, a non-profit organization whose mission was to engage new audiences with art. Jennifer owned a fine art photography gallery in Atlanta (Jennifer Schwartz Gallery) for five years, and she co-founded Flash Powder Projects, a photographer-focused collaborative venture and publishing company. In the spring of 2013, she traveled around the country in a 1977 VW bus, engaging audiences with photography.

To order a copy of Continuum, or see more titles from Yoffy Press, please visit their website: http://www.yoffypress.com/

New Ways of Seeing: The Democratic Language of Photography by Grant Scott

© Grant Scott. From New Ways of Seeing

The strength of New Ways of Seeing is in the discussion of where we are today. The discourse and investigation of photography and learning the craft of fluently speaking a visual language is at the forefront. The book feels perfectly positioned to appeal to both students and educators of visual arts, or anyone wanting to better understand the importance of applying practiced skills and knowledge to the visual language of photography.

The ‘democratic language of photography’ couldn’t be more appropriate as a guide or theme throughout Grant Scott’s new book New Ways of Seeing. In a very agreeable tone set in the text, Scott presents his opinion about how we got to the current position of the billions of people worldwide who carry a camera each day. However, he makes the point that this fact does not necessarily make us all well versed in a photographic, or visual language.

I’d like to make a short comment at the start of this review. Aside from the single image chosen from the book and the cover image, this review largely focuses on subject matter and not images. It’s a significant departure from my normal reviews, but one that I’ve tried to make in an effort to highlight the significance of how we all can write and talk about photography without the narrative crutch of photos to illustrate the ideas.

In the book, Scott easily recognizes the importance of pre-smartphone photography and visual storytelling, while also giving credit to the importance of the ease and ability of photographers to create without the burden of expense, or perhaps ironically, without the burden of a traditional photography education. Thus giving rise to photographers being able to proliferate personal projects and elevate the democratization of photography.

The book is laid out in chapters, but as Scott mentions in his introduction, it is not necessary to read them in order. His chapters cover a broad spectrum of topics and they are presented with the sentiment of embracing change. Scott liberally references photographers of prominence and notes the significance of their work – historically and contextually. He gives them ample credit for the influence they have made for contemporary photographers, even if it is without their awareness. The importance of internet sites like Instagram are given credit, due to the role they have played in the process of forming and informing the lives of people studying photography. Scott says in the chapter Speaking in a Digital Environment:

“For a photographer to ignore the impact of Instagram on lens-based image creation could be an act of informed decision making. For a teacher involved in photographic education to ignore Instagram’s impact on the next generation of photographers would be an act of denial and negligence”.

I enjoyed reading through the range of topics, and embraced Scott’s attitude toward a general inclusion of all the advances in smartphone, digital, and computational photography, rather than adopting a stance of being firmly grounded in traditional analog photography and scoffing the present state. The role of narrative and telling a meaningful story through the visual language of images is a primary theme throughout. Scott mentions that many people currently studying photography more readily identify themselves as visual storytellers, rather than as photographers. Very little attention is paid to gear or kit as it applies to how to make meaningful work, but the technological advances of photographic equipment are chronicled for the purpose of better understanding how we’ve gotten to this point. This is one of the most meaningful books about photography that I’ve read. It is highly informed, but not over my head, and ultimately invites the reader to thoughtfully inspect and challenge their own practices of being an image creator.


New Ways of Seeing: The Democratic Language of Photography by Grant Scott
240 pages, 5.6 x 0.6 x 8.4 inches, 60 color photos
Published by Bloomsbury Visual Arts, 2019
ISBN-10: 135004931X
ISBN-13: 978-1350049314


Grant Scott is the founder of United Nations of Photography, a Senior Lecturer in Photography at Oxford Brookes University, UK, a working photographer, and the author of several previously published books.

His documentary film, Do Not Bend: The Photographic Life of Bill Jay has been screened across the UK, Canada, and the United States, and was ultimately posted for free via YouTube in the spirit of sharing knowledge.

Grant Scott is the founder of United Nations of Photography, a Senior Lecturer in Photography at Oxford Brookes University, UK, a working photographer, and the author of several previously published books. He can be found on Twitter at @UNofPhoto

His documentary film, Do Not Bend: The Photographic Life of Bill Jay has been screened across the UK, Canada, and the United States, and was ultimately posted for free via YouTube in the spirit of sharing knowledge.

To buy a copy of New Ways of Seeing, it can be found on Amazon here, or at the publisher site here. Check out the website for  United Nations of Photography and to find out more about Grant Scott or see his work, please see his website: https://www.grantscott.com/

Taradiddle by Charles H. Traub

A taradiddle by definition is a petty lie, a little falsehood or trifling told often to amuse or embellish a story. But the Oxford English Dictionary also offers a second meaning: Pretentious or empty talk; senseless, unproductive activity; nonsense. Ironically, it’s a self deprecating term for such meaningful work. But then, that’s part of the fun.

So many of the images created by Traub involve witty visual interplay, tongue-in-cheek sight gags that beg the viewer to look again. But that summary sells them short. There’s much more going on here, there is wit and a sophisticated way of seeing what is in front of the camera. Traub’s work in Taradiddle is a collection of discoveries built around the idea of seeing — not just looking. He is a photographer’s photographer; demonstrating mastery of the medium without hubris or egotism. There is keen observation without embellishment in Taub’s oeuvre. As David Campany writes in this introduction to the book, the unifying element to Traub’s work is that “they are all in one way or another about photography. They may even amount to a commentary upon photography as a phenomenon of daily life. Photography as something we do daily, and photographs as things we encounter daily, often by chance. To this extent at least, these are meta-photographs.” Photos about photography.

An assistant to Traub suggested the term ‘taradiddle’ during the process of curating the images that would ultimately comprise the book. It stuck. An influence and friend early in Traub’s photo career was fellow Kentuckian Ralph Eugene Meatyard. Meatyard kept a collection of names he found funny and/or interesting. One could easily imagine the list might include a Miss Tara Diddle, of Lexington. In that spirit, Traub’s images ask the viewer to see and absorb an inside joke: the landscape painting of Death Valley on the side of a building located in front of the actual mountain range of Death Valley. A large red rock with hand-painted white letters in Monte Vista, Colorado prompting the visitor to bring the camera. He did. Ironic tongue-in-cheek humor with signage and whimsy like the Estate of Confusion building in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Or the compositional use of a natural frame-within-a-frame in a street scene in New Orleans to highlight we are viewing a selective representation of the three-dimensional world — an image akin to the work of Luigi Ghirri, one of the most influential conceptual photographers of the 20th century.

Over the span of the book we see the Michelangelo fresco painting of the Creation of Adam in several iterations. We see it in a hardware store, a poster reproduction poorly framed within a larger gold frame mounted to a wall, or in a faded wallpaper pattern behind a framed photo of a wedding portrait with bride and groom in a similar pose, touching hands, creating a future together. Traub captures an image of faux wooden boards with painted shadows on a flat metal door, mimicry of floral patterns on upholstery and carpet placed in front of a nature scene right outside the window. These witty visual interplays beg the viewer to think about visual reproduction, visual representation, and realistically… it can be humorous how people often choose to replicate a natural environment in such unnatural ways.

It is always a joy to pour over artwork in a book where the next image can’t come quickly enough, or there can’t be too many of; like a child who eagerly begs their parent to repeat a joke or trick they adore — again…do it again. Taradiddle is one of those books where I found myself soaking in the images, laughing to myself or making a interjection of appreciation, then quickly turning the page to see the next one, and the next, then the final one, only to work my way back toward the front of the book again. I have seen Traub’s work before the opportunity came to review this project, but critically thinking about it prompted the realization that I hadn’t fully recognized how much his photography was interconnected to other masters of photography who inform my comprehensive view of photography.

Taradiddle brings out the simplistic joy of creating images; photographing without pretense or strict conceptual confinement. “For me, serendipity, coincidence and chance are more interesting than any preconceived construct of our human encounters”, Traub says. Make no mistake, creating images and understanding the concepts and implied meanings and interpretations is required in endeavors such as this. Traub believes one should not front-load the creative process for fear of restriction, “All image making is basically conceptual and needs introspection. However, a self-conscious praxis often constipates it.“

Whether the final image is simple to describe, or built upon a complex relationship of elements within the frame, Traub’s work transcends subject matter and speaks most importantly to what we are seeing. It’s more than documenting a place, it’s more than a portrait of a person, it’s more than capturing the essence of a place. His work connects conceptual ideas with a visual interpretation of the world we live in, and also experience through photography. His images strive to lay bare the profound commonality of our lives; serendipity and humor included.

Taradiddle by Charles H. Traub

Essay by David Campany

Published by Damiani

Hardcover, 11.75 x 9.5 in / 116 pgs / 100 color

ISBN 9788862086219


Charles Traub was born in Louisville, KY and has been photographing for 50 years. He has eleven books to his credit and sixty major exhibitions including one person shows at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Hudson River Museum, the Historic New Orleans collection, and is in the collections of more than two dozen international museums. For the past 30 years, he has been the Chairperson of the MFA Photography, Video and Related Media program at the School of Visual Arts and presently is the Co-Director of the Aaron Siskind Foundation.

David Campany is a writer, curator, and artist who is widely recognized for his award-winning essays and books regarding the lens and screen arts. He teaches at the University of Westminister in London and is the recipient of the ICP Infinity award and the Royal Photographic Society’s award for writing.


To purchase a copy of Taradiddle please visit www.artbook.comTo find out more information about Charles H. Traub and view his work, please visit his website at www.charlestraub.com/


This review was first published in F-Stop Magazine in December 2018.

Sense of Place Exhibition

The inaugural exhibition hosted by Wobneb Magazine - with essay by Rob Hudson

Wobneb Magazine wants to provide opportunities for photographers to exhibit in group online exhibitions with no entry fee. This series of exhibitions is open to any amateur or professional photographer around the globe — with the goal of providing the chance for many different people to contribute to the theme. The inaugural theme for 2018 is Sense of Place.

On some level, each photographer tries to convey an observable sense of a place within a slice of a second; hopefully transcending mere documentation of physical appearance to impart a feeling of their experience or emotions. This exhibition is fortunate to have a range of styles and methods used to address the theme. Photojournalist Louise Wateridge’s image of a Syrian refugee child playing with a pigeon is reflective of her sense of place as an observer; capturing a moment of joy within a life of hardship, and creating a strong image without being overly invasive. The work of photographer J.M. Golding is connected to specific locations and presents a spiritual and philosophical connection to the world around her. She observes and transforms the views into what exists internally as well. The landscape by Ellen Jantzen takes a step further into how an artist can capture an image or images of a place, and create new realities in her process of looking beyond surface and trying to reveal something emotional through her manipulations.

Rob Hudson is a special contributor to this exhibition. In his essay, Hudson addresses the idea of place and how photographers try ultimately to show the uniqueness and insight each person brings to the table. In addition, Hudson and photographer Al Brydon contribute images from their respective regions of Wales and England to share their sense of place with respect to their own relationship with the land.

For this exhibition, we asked photographers to consider the following: What is the social or physical landscape where you live? How do you define your sense of place in the world? A sympathetic understanding is the goal of any photographer. Each one asks the viewer to look at what they’ve captured with their camera, recall their own personal experiences, and draw meaning from the connections. We asked contributors to show how they document or interpret the world around them, and convey a sense of place using their unique visual voice. This exhibition is an exploration of that idea, our surroundings, as well as ourselves.


A Sense of Place by Rob Hudson

I’ve just returned from spending a few days in somewhere that, to me at least, has a strong sense of place — the St. David’s peninsula in the far southwest of Wales. It was one of the places in Britain where the first Christians arrived from Ireland, now memorialized in both the place’s name, and the cathedral tucked into a little valley to hide it from Viking marauders. There’s a sense of human history here that is so close to the surface and obvious in such a sparsely populated area. It seems to shine forth in a way I don’t recognize or feel about in the city I live within.

The tilted rock strata produces a long line of low hills that seem to rise up from the surrounding plane with the character of mountains. They look like leaning triangles, and that feature is carried all the way to the sea cliffs and the outlying islands. If you imagine that line of hills to be the dorsal fins of a giant subterranean whale, several miles long, then the cliffs and jutting rocks are its teeth having taken giant bites out of the coastline.

A Pembrokeshire Triangulation -05 Rob Hudson
© Rob Hudson, from ‘A Pembrokeshire Triangulation’

I could tell you these things, and create the idea of a sense of place in your mind to illustrate how the uniqueness of a place makes it stand out. Is it uniqueness, or because I’ve been visiting here since I was a boy, and have a strong emotional connection to this place? Perhaps it is because there’s a commonality of features which we recognize as having a sense of place. I can also tell you that six different people from varying ages, genders or cultures have independently described this place as having something ‘magical’ about it (and it’s a term I’d happily subscribe to myself); but this brings us no closer to explaining or identifying any features that give a sense of place.

Al Brydon 2
© Al Brydon, from the ‘None Places’ series

The poet Edward Thomas wrote the phrase, ‘Within the spaces between’, which simply sums up the connection we make to the often unappreciated places we visit — especially when we engage with making an artistic response to them. A sense of place isn’t a simple concept to understand. We all recognize it when we feel that connection, but like many emotional responses it is more difficult to explain in words. Perhaps this is because a sense of place isn’t an inherent aspect of a place’s identity at all, but something we project onto it. In short, it is a social and cultural construct. This isn’t to suggest that a sense of place is lesser because of its human roots; landscape itself is an idea, and it doesn’t exist outside the human realm. Both terms express the power place can hold over us, the depth of our emotional connection.

A Pembrokeshire Triangulation -22 Rob Hudson
© Rob Hudson, from ‘A Pembrokeshire Triangulation’

Equally important is to consider what the opposite of a sense of place might entail — what is ‘placenessness’? Placeless spaces are just as valuable in artistic expression as those that have a sense of place. A few years ago my good friend and fellow founder member of the Inside the Outside collective made a series of photographs he termed ‘None Places’. Like others engaged with a radical interpretation of landscape, Al Brydon’s ‘None Places’ are sites of freedom, which allowing for a more anarchic expression. It is arguable that after we put a frame around a photograph of a place, it ceases to be placeless because we’ve begun the process of myth making and story telling, which contribute to the creation of a sense of place. This doesn’t mean they are invalidated, they are worthy of our exploration and expression, but we should also be aware of our own contradictions. As Gertrude Stein said, “There is no there there”.

Al Brydon 3
© Al Brydon, from the ‘None Places’ series

The truth is, we make or find a sense of place if we look long and hard enough. After all, that is the job of the artist or photographer — to show others our insights. In essence we’re trying to understand and express ourselves through the medium of our relationship to place. But, and this is an important ‘but’, we don’t all share the same experiences of place. Our world is so full of imagery; only an individual’s unique response to place will stand out. That’s easier than it sounds. We have to do the legwork. It’s taken me approximately 40 years to visually consummate my love for St. David’s peninsula; I hope you’ll achieve success somewhat faster.


Ed Fetahovic
© Ed Fetahovic, Smaller Like Man, Perth, Western Australia  http://www.edfetahovicphotography.com

KathyShorr
© Kathy Shorr, Bench, Miami, FL http://www.kathyshorr.com/

Eric Moore
© Eric Moore, untitled, Saguaro National Park, Tucson, Arizona https://elmoore.myportfolio.com

Ethan Lo
© Ethan Lo, Omission, Hong Kong http://www.ethanlo.co.uk

Emmanuel_Monzon
© Emmanuel Monzon, Urban Sprawl Emptiness, Yucca Valley, CA https://admonzon.format.com/#1

Ritam Talukdar
© Ritam Talukdar, And the journey ended, Pondicherry, India https://ritamsphotocreation.wordpress.com/

RobTM
© Rob™, Roads, Lancashire, UK http://www.robtm.co.uk

Yuriy Pavlov
© Yuriy Pavlov, Sacred place, Saint-Petersburg, https://www.ypavlov.com/

Amanda Le Kline
© Amanda Le Kline, Origins, Strausstown, Pennsylvania https://amandalekline.com/

J. M. Golding
© J. M. Golding, At the frontier of the known world, northern California http://www.jmgolding.com

Anne See
© Anne See, Walking Among Giants, Muir Woods National Monument, Mill Valley, CA https://www.instagram.com/cheeksandchubs/

Cassinello
© Cristóbal Carretro Cassinello, Blue Almería, Almeria, Spain http://www.cccassinello.com

Amelia Morris
© Amelia Morris, Self Portrait as a Ghost, Indianapolis, IN http://www.thanksandsorryphotos.com

catherine_slye
© Catherine Slye, Nightlight, Tucson, AZ https://www.catslye.com/

Alexandr_Polyantsev_01
© Alexandr Polyantsev, Playground, Arkhangelsk region, Russia https://polyantsev.ru

Marc Sirinsky
© Marc Sirinsky, Plane, Leesburg, VA http://www.sirinsky.com

Kristel Collison
© Kristel Collison, Noticing the Unnoticed, Northern Pennines, UK, https://instagram.com//kristel.collison

Elizabeth Virgl
© Elizabeth Virgl, Oil Refinery, Roxanna, IL

Wioleta Kaminska
© Wioleta Kaminska, Inside Silence, San Francisco, CA http://wioletakaminska.com

© Aldebarán Solares, Untitled from Umbral series, Marsella, Fr
© Aldebarán Solares, Untitled from Umbral series, Marsella, France http://www.aldebaransolares.com

David Thackwell
© David Thackwell, The Wilderness – Prologue, Hooke Park, Dorset https://dthackwell.com

Jennifer Mayhall
© Jennifer Mayhall, Rite of Passage, Cincinnati, Ohio, https://www.instagram.com/inspiration_catalyst

Piercarlo Quecchia
© Piercarlo Quecchia, The New Tomorrow Myth, Gligino Hill, Dobrljin, Bosnia & Herzegovina https://piercarloquecchia.com

Tatyana Kolbatova
© Tatyana Kolbatova, Exit to, Saint-Petersburg, Russia, https://tatyanakolbatova.com/

Ellen Jantzen
© Ellen Jantzen, Equilibrium, New Mexico,  http://www.ellenjantzen.com/

Gina Costa
© Gina Costa,Neighborhood Night Stories, South Bend,IN, http://www.ginacosta.com

Mark Sawrie
© Mark Sawrie, Twins, Joshua Tree, CA https://www.artistslashsomethingorother.com

Allan Lewis
© Allan Lewis, Gin Parlour, London, ON, allanl.com

Abhiruk Lahiri
© Abhiruk Lahiri, Urban dreams, Delhi http://clweb.csa.iisc.ernet.in/res12/abhiruk.lahiri/phaotography

Nathan Gentry
© Nathan Gentry, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania http://www.nathangentryphoto.com

Andy Mellor
© Andrew Mellor, Yesterdays, Blackpool, UK http://www.andrewmellorphotography.com

Peter Ydeen
© Peter Ydeen, Bath Construction http://peterydeen.com/

Louise Wateridge
© Louise Wateridge, Life After War -Syrian Refugee Child playing with a Pigeon in a refugee camp in Beqaa Governate, Lebanon https://www.louisewateridge.com/

Gildo Spado
© Gildo Spado, Topsy Turvy, Astoria Queens, NY http://www.gildonyc.com

Allen Morris
© Allen Morris, untitled, Milwaukee, WI http://www.allenmorrisphoto.com

Diane Fenster
© Diane Fenster, I Hear the Mermaids Singing Each to Each, Pacifica, CA http://www.lensculture.com/diane-fenster

Mirja Paljakka
© Mirja Paljakka, My place, Ylojarvi / Finland, https://mirjapaljakka.weebly.com

Nicolas Guillen
© Nicolas Guillen, Estivation, Orléans, France http://www.nguillen.com

Callie Zimmerman
© Callie Zimmerman, Turf, Fowler, IN http://www.calliezimmerman.com

Julia Ivantei-Ershova
© Julia Ivantei-Ershova, Guest, Saint Petersburg, Russia https://uabymtvk6xec.wfolio.ru/

SolaresEstefania
© Estefania Pec, Full and empty, México city https://www.instagram.com/keenkll/

Alison Benbow UK
© Alison Benbow, untitled, Liverpool, UK

Naomi Lofkin
© Naomi Lofkin, Finding Space, Dartmoor, England, https://naomilofphoto.myportfolio.com

Alex Cavalco
© Alex Cavalco, Waffle House, Milwaukee, WI http://alexcaval.co

Michael Bach
© Michael Bach, Rt. 32. Waterviliet, NY, January 2018 http.// http://www.michaelpbach.crevado.com

Devon DeVaughn
© Devon DeVaughn, RV, Eugene, OR http://www.devondevaughn.com

Martin Buday
© Martin Buday, Prophetic Kingdom, Milford, DE. 2018. http://martinbuday.com

Audrey Gottlieb
© Audrey Gottlieb, Utopia Parkway, Flushing, Queens, NY_www.audreygottlieb.com

Arthur Fields
© Arthur Fields, OBB, Vincennes, IN http://www.arthurfields.net

Tasha Lutek
© Tasha Lutek, Kitchen, Rockwood, TN http://www.tashalutek.com

 


Sense of Place, October 2018 Wobneb Magazine

Rob Hudson is one of the co-founders of Inside the Outside, a collective of landscape photographers based in the UK. He has contributed to a number of books and projects on landscape photography, and his photographs have been shown in a number of prominent exhibitions throughout the UK.
www.robhudsonlandscape.net
Twitter @RobHudsonPhoto
Instagram @robhudson_

Al Brydon’s ‘None Places’ by kind permission www.al-brydon.com.

Inside the Outside collective:
www.inside-the-outside.com
Twitter @inside_the_out
Instagram @insidetheoutsidegroup

This exhibition is also published at on Medium.com. All images are used with permission. I want to sincerely thank all the contributors and artists for sharing their work. —Cary Benbow, Publisher, Wobneb Magazine