Category Archives: Exhibition

Art Through the Lens 2017 – The Yeiser Art Center | Eliot Dudik – Juror

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Art Through the Lens 2017

Dates: October 14 – November 25, 2017
Reception: Friday October 13th from 5-7pm  

The Yeiser Art Center (YAC) is pleased to be hosting the annual international juried photography arts competition, Art Through the Lens. Originating in 1975 as the Paducah Summer Festival Photo Competition, Paducah Photo has grown from a fledgling contest into an international juried exhibition. Over the past 40 years, this exhibition has become one of the Mid-South’s most prestigious annual photographic events. To honor its history, the exhibition now exists in two parts: the International Show which features the juror’s selection and the Regional Showcase chosen by second juror.

“It was my great pleasure to be this year’s juror for the Art Through the Lens exhibition at the Yeiser Art Center,” said Eliot Dudik. “The first juried exhibition I applied to and was selected for was Paducah Photo 2009, which I believe was the older version of Art Through the Lens, so this exhibition means a lot to me as it was a springboard of sorts for my own work. Jurying an art exhibition is no easy task, especially one with 621 exceptional entries. There were certainly photographs that didn’t ultimately make the cut that I had a very difficult time letting go. Selecting images for an exhibition is by no means black & white. We all have our own tastes and interests. My interests in photography are quite broad, as are my interests in music, film, and literature, which made the selection process for this lens-based art exhibition even more difficult. I do, however, have a tendency toward material and process, experimentation, risk, ideas, nuance, and heart. I believe the selections made for the 2017 Art Through the Lens exhibition carry all of these things, and I hope you’ll enjoy interacting with them as I did.”

This year’s opening reception will be held on Friday October 13th from 5-7pm, and will include light refreshments and the announcement of awards. The reception is free and open to the public. After the reception, there will be a $5 admission to see the exhibition. Proceeds support the Yeiser Art Center’s mission to bring exceptional arts educational programming to Paducah. YAC Members and guests under 13 years of age always enter free of charge. 


Located in downtown Paducah, the Yeiser Art Center is a non-profit visual arts organization celebrating sixty years (1957 – 2017) of serving the community through exhibitions and education throughout the Tri-State Region. The Yeiser Art Center is wheelchair accessible.   

Hours of Operation:
Tuesday – Saturday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Admission: $5 for non members, YAC members and children under 13 free.
For questions, please email the YAC at office@theyeiser.org or call 270-442-2453.  Visit theyeiser.org for more info on upcoming events.

Nicolò Sertorio – Once We Were Here

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Filter Photo is pleased to announce Once We Were Here, a solo exhibition of work by Nicolò Sertorio, at Filter Space gallery.

Nicolò Sertorio considers himself privileged: white, male, educated, healthy, living in the Western world. He is, however, admittedly part of a ‘disenchanted generation’ born after WWII when globalization seemed like a great idea, a path towards unification, only to be awakened to a hard reality of inequality and environmental abuse. Contemporary media is filled with alarming news: ice melting, fresh water contamination, overpopulation, corporate greed, food poisoning, oil dependency, and wealth inequality, among other things. It seems the world has lost its mystery to become the playground of the very few at the expense of the many. Nicolò Sertorio’s photographs address the resulting sense of powerlessness that has left communities disenfranchised, resulting in a lack of social or environmental accountability.

Presented as a hypothetical archeological study on the nature of co-existence, Sertorio’s series, Once We Were Here, presents the viewer with a world where humanity’s need for insatiable consumption has led it to the ultimate consumption: the consumption of the self. We are shown a world where the selfishness of humanity has disappeared yet nature remains in its solemnness. Nature has endured and overcome the weight of humanity’s selfish behaviors and we are reunited with nature’s beauty and mystery.

http://filterphoto.org/portfolio/once-we-were-here/

Nicolò Sertorio is an artist based in Oakland, CA (born in Italy). He grew up influenced by both European and American culture in a family with a long tradition in academia, arts, and science. This multicultural and scientific upbringing influenced him to be both analytical and explorative.  Traveling extensively and living in many countries from an early age has left him with a unique combination of European sensibility and complex, and at times conflicting, worldviews.

Once We Were Here
Nicolò Sertorio
Exhibition Dates: November 3 – November 25, 2017
Opening Reception: November 3 | 6pm – 9pm
Location: Filter Space 1821 W. Hubbard St., Ste. 207, Chicago, IL 60622
Gallery Hours: Monday – Saturday | 11am – 5pm

Filter Space is free and open to the public.

Filter Photo Festival 2017 Opens in Chicago

 

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Filter Photo Festival – opening night exhibition at Fogelson Studio

The 2017 Filter Photo Festival kicked off on Thursday, September 21st. The events continue through Sunday, September 24th; with workshops, portfolio reviews, artist talks and exhibitions all coordinated throughout the four days of the festival.

The festival includes a number of events and talks that are free and open to the public at several locations in the loop area and local galleries. The full schedule is available at Filter Photo’s site: http://filterphoto.org/filter-festival/

Thursday’s events were capped off with exhibition openings. Filter Photo held its first Members’ Exhibition, Prime.  Juror, Kat Kiernan, Director of Panopticon Gallery and Editor-in-Chief of Don’t Take Pictures magazine, chose five artists for an installation at Fogelson Studio.  All of the submitted work can be seen in the online exhibition, which represents the quality and breadth of work being produced by Filter Photo Members.

we like small things install shot
‘we like small things’ at Filter Space Gallery

Juror, Jennifer Keats, Director of The Donut Shop, chose a compelling assortment of small works for the show at Filter Space Gallery, we like small things. Keats invited 30 artists who created the small and unique works in we like small things, each motivated to create artwork of the highest standards both in its materiality and its meaning. The history of photographic prints and the attitude toward their size has been an ever-changing one. People have much more cognitive over-load than ever before, and that can take a toll. In a world in which viewers are increasingly assaulted with imagery, artworks in small scales allow us a sense of control, a space to retreat, when we are able to fit it into the palm of our hands.

The third exhibit opening was Deception. The show’s juror, Brian Paul Clamp, Director, ClampArt, wrote this about the exhibition, “Deception and deceit typically are perceived as dark and ominous. But one can also fall victim to less treacherous duplicity—trickery more playful in nature. My inclusions in the exhibition include both formal and conceptual deceptions. And while some of the strong work in the show naturally might feel sinister and at times even frightening, there is an equal amount of lighthearted mischievousness and fun—representing balance and parity rather than a single-sided interpretation of the theme”.

Milee Tibbs-Deception show
From ‘Mount Analogue’ series by Millee Tibbs

Events continue throughout the weekend – For more information about the Filter Photo Festival, including schedule of events, workshops, portfolio review sessions, and contact information – please visit the Filter Photo website: www.filterphoto.org

127 Film Photography Day — Call for Entries

127 Film Photography will feature 127-format photographs made on July 12, 2017 in a special exhibition. You’re invited to participate.

No fees, no competition, just a friendly virtual community joining together to make 127-format photos on July 12, 2017.

How to enter and show your work:

  1. Take 127-format photographs on July 12, 2017.
  2. Send one of those photographs to 127 Film Photography. Please email one jpg file, 500 pixels wide, to 127filmformat ~at~ gmail.com, by August 12, 2017.
  3. In the subject line of your email, type “July 2017 127 Day.”
  4. In the body of the email, please include the copyright symbol, your name, the title of the photograph, location, camera and film types, and your website address (or other link to your work). In that order. Please follow this example:

© J. M. Golding, Out of nowhere, northern California, USA, Kodak Brownie Fiesta, ReraPan, http://www.jmgolding.com

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© J.M. Golding

More details are at http://127film.blogspot.com/2017/06/summer-127-day-is-coming.html

Photo Exhibition Explores the Way Disruption Impacts Our Lives

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Now through June 11th, the curated exhibition, Disruption is being held at The Factory in Long Island City, Queens, NY.

Each distinguished artist was selected based on work developed independently, for an extended period of time. Each artist uses documentary directness, humor, pathos and poetry in their images. Separately, they address the connective topics of lives interrupted, lives cut short, lives spent separated from family, their own cultural identity and of quiet personal sacrifices made every day. They bring the perspective of being outsiders, as well as insiders to the world we live in and sometimes struggle to understand and come to terms with.

The international group of artists chosen for Disruption are Verónica Cárdenas, Kris Graves, Griselda San Martín, G.D. McClintock, and Orestes González.

The Factory
4th floor
30-30 47 Avenue
Long Island City, Queens, NY

www.disruptiontheexhibit.com

Through The Wall
© Griselda San Martin
triple wedding
© G.D. McClintock from the series Triple Wedding
michael brown
The Murder of Michael Brown © Kris Graves
disqualified
Disqualified, Qualified Girls © Orestes González
castile
The Murder of Philando Castile © Kris Graves
trump
© Verónica Cárdenas

 

Here and Now: Street Portraits of Londoners by Niall McDiarmid

The photo exhibition, Here and Now, is now open at the Museum of London. It runs through till October 15th. The work of London based photographer Niall McDiarmid will be mounted in the Rotunda space outside the museum and is open all day and night. It features 34 large scale prints from across the capital shot over the past 6 years.

Brushfield Street, London — April 2012 © Niall McDiarmid

Two of McDiarmid’s long-term projects, Crossing Paths: A Portrait of Britain, and Via Vauxhall, were published in book format; in addition to publishing the work online in dedicated websites. Both projects are series of portraits made by McDiarmid in his encounters with people throughout the UK over the past six years or so, and specifically for Via Vauxhall in the area surrounding the Vauxhall neighborhood of London. “Individually these photos represent the moment that we crossed paths, but collectively they represent my portrait of London — a confident city, a city of the future, a city I call home.”

From Via Vauxhall © Niall McDiarmid
McDiarmid’s photographic style can be described as ‘straight’, ‘documentary’ or even ‘street photography’. But make no mistake, McDiarmid’s stylistic approach often plays upon subtle use of color or pattern that is never arbitrary; it functions in highly sophisticated ways to connect elements and patterns in his subject’s clothing with their surroundings. In this manner, the people in his portraits are woven into the scene they occupy — an integral part of their surroundings.
Surrey Street, Croydon – January 2016 © Niall McDiarmid
For more info on the exhibit, see the site for Museum of London. To see more of Niall McDiarmid’s work, please visit his website. To read an in-depth interview with McDiarmid, see this article in Vantage, Niall McDiarmid Captures the Faces of our Times

ECHOLILIA by Timothy Archibald – Artist Talk at Fort Wayne Museum of Art, April 8th at 10 am

17424841_10155068208997356_6715294596662139966_nECHOLILIA is an eleven-image curation from a larger body of work, a collaboration between photographer Timothy Archibald and his eldest son, Eli. Taken at their home in El Sobrante, California, these primarily unstaged images intimately narrate a tense but respectful artistic and personal relationship between father and child, when the two are learning to understand the meaning of autism and importance of awareness.

Acquired by the Fort Wayne Museum of Art in 2017, Timothy’s affecting and technically impressive photographic prints visualize a poignant message that is applicable to humanity as a whole: The indispensability of empathy when regarding the human condition allows us to understand that idiosyncrasies exist among us all. 

This exhibit is presented along with Sharon and Expressions of Existence, forming a triad of exhibitions exploring the impact of disability on the creation of art. They are made possible by the AWS Foundation.

Join us for an artist talk and tour with the creators of the ECHOLILIA photographs, Timothy Archibald, and his son Eli. Sign language interpreter will be present. Free with museum admission.

Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Fort Wayne, Indiana – http://www.fwmoa.org

To see more work by Timothy Archibald, visit his website: http://www.timothyarchibald.com

Art & Oppression: PhotoSummer Exhibit Opportunity @ CENTER

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ART & OPPRESSION

CENTER and the Santa Fe University of Art & Design’s Marion Center for Photographic Arts will host an exhibition and discussion on the theme of Art & Oppression to kick off PhotoSummer’s 2017 events. We invite you to submit your images and participate in the upcoming events surrounding photography’s important role in activism and advocacy.

The exhibition will open at the Marion Center for Photographic Arts on Friday, June 9, 2017 from 5-7pm and continue through September 15, 2017. Stay tuned for more information about the panel discussion exploring the topic on June 10, 2017.

SUBMIT YOUR WORK

The call opens on March 17 and all applications are due by April 16. Accepted submissions will be notified by April 21, 2017. Free for CENTER Members and $25 entry fee for non-members. Click here to learn more and to apply.

CENTER MEMBERSHIP

Previous members and non-members are encouraged to take advantage of this exhibition opportunity and the many other CENTER member benefits we offer throughout the year. For information on memberships and to sign up, please visit our Membership page.

FORMAT17 | HABITAT

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AHEAD STILL LIES OUR FUTURE

QUAD Gallery, Derby, UK
24 March – 11 June 2017

Lida Abdul | Lisa Barnard | Ursula Biemann | Kenta Cobayashi | Hannah Darabi | Sohrab Hura | Zhang Jungang | Wanuri Kahiu | Ester Vonplon | Sadie Wechsler

The 2017 edition of FORMAT, the UK’s largest photography festival will explore the theme of HABITAT. The biennial festival, now in its 8th edition, is a showcase for emerging talent alongside established artists. FORMAT17 will display work by over 200 international artists and photographers across 30 exhibitions, alongside a photobook market, portfolio reviews and a series of innovative events and performances.


Rapid changes in the environment caused by human impact on the Earth has pushed us into a new cultural geographical epoch known as the ‘Anthoropocene’. Ahead Still Lies Our Future brings together 10 international artists whose diverse work encourages speculation on global imagined futures. This is the focal exhibition of FORMAT17, curated by Hester Keijser and Louise Clements, in response to the festival’s theme of HABITAT.

The artworks range from Ester Vonplon’s requiem for the melting glaciers in her native Switzerland, to Lida Adbul’s video installation in which she returns to her homeland of Afghanistan to ask how the individual can deal with memories of a country so marked by war and tragedy. Especially for FORMAT, the Japanese transmedia artist Kenta Cobayashi will recreate his immersive and VR installation Island is Islands and Lisa Barnard’s exploration of gold, its mythology, influence and impact will be shown for the first time.

Ursula Biemann documents a series of landmark legal cases that brought the Amazonian forest to court to plead for the rights of nature in her video Forest Law, while Sohrab Hura captures life in the twilight moments of the extreme summer heat in a small village of Central India, and Zhang Jungang tirelessly photographs the ever-changing view from his tiny balcony of the bridge over the Song Hua River in Northern China. Hannah Darabi compiles photographs of a ‘new town’ under construction near Tehran with excerpts from J.G. Ballard’s short story Waiting Grounds in a series of the same title. Other artists create alternative worlds – Wanuri Kahiu explores a dystopian future in her film Pumzi, and Sadie Wechsler’s images show constructed fantastical landscapes.

Collectively, these 10 artists explore the interconnected nature of the human spirit and the habitat that it encounters or creates.


WORKS ON DISPLAY


What we have overlooked is Lida Adbul’s monumental video installation in which she returned to her homeland of Afghanistan to explore how the individual can deal with the memories of a country so marked by war and tragedy. Filmed by a lake near Kabul, the video shows a man, voiced by subtitles, in the lake holding flag, progressively slipping underwater. The project examines the relationship between the individual and the nation, represented respectively by the man and the flag. Man, voice and flag finally vanish under the surface of the lake, suggesting the high price paid by nationalist feeling – the annulment of the individual.

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The Canary and the Hammer, new work by Lisa Barnard, considers the omnipresent nature of gold – concealed in our technology, a barometer for the economy, a global potent symbol of ultimate value, beauty, purity, greed and political power. In response to the financial crisis of 2008, Barnard’s photographs strive to make connections between very different stories focusing on the United Kingdom, and both North and South America. Exploring mythologies of the discovery of gold and the mania of the gold-rush, the brutal world of mining and sexual politics of the industry,. Barnard investigates how gold has become an indispensable component in engineering and electronic industries and offers solutions to a range of global health and environmental challenges.


Forest Law by Ursula Biemann is a synchronized video shot in the Amazonian rain forest in 2013. The oil-and-mining frontier in the Ecuadorian Amazon— one of the most biodiverse and mineral-rich regions on Earth – is currently under pressure from the dramatic expansion of large-scale extraction activities. At the heart of Forest Law is a series of landmark legal cases that bring the forest to court and plead for the Rights of Nature. One particularly complex trial has recently been won by the Kichwa Indigenous People of Sarayuku based on their cosmology of the Living Forest.


Japanese artist Kenta Cobayashi will recreate his immersive and VR installation Island is Islands. In 2011, Cobayashi started to post photographs on his blog which were then duplicated, converted, and referred to across the internet. His photographs are the product of the process of transitioning, bred through a repetitive cycle of interaction and transformation. By altering the size or zooming in on the images on the Internet, the image infinitely breeds by a simple finger movement. Each new iteration of Islands is Islands experiments with visual live performance alongside new prints and visual images.


Waiting Grounds by Iranian artist Hannah Darabi is a photographic series about an under construction ‘new town’ near Tehran. Inspired by a J.G. Ballard short story of the same title, the work combines photographs and the cut-ups of text from Waiting Grounds. The main character in Ballard’s story lives on another planet and learns that life on Earth is terminated. All that remains is history written and engraved on gold columns in a code language. The protagonist decides to wait for the future – a future that “whatever it is, it must be worth waiting for”. Darabi’s work aims to represent the state of waiting in a country where history has been rewritten over and over again and where each version of the history has its glorious past which become an example for a possible future.


The Song of Sparrows in a Hundred Days of Summer by Sohrab Hura is a series of photographs taken in Barwani, the central state of Madhya Pradesh, one of the hottest regions in India. Since 2013, Hura has been photographing the summer in Savariyapani, a small village secluded amongst the barren landscape of this region. With little rainfall and extreme temperatures, life in Savariyapani can take on an unexpected reality in the twilight moments of the heat.


Bridge and Nearby Scenery is a series of photographs taken between 2013 and 2016 from artist Zhang Jungang’s tiny balcony in the Northern Chinese city of Harbin. The balcony has a view of the bridge over the Song Hua River, and the vista changes almost every day, with variations in light and air from moment to moment. With long winters and short summers, there is always a new view for Zhang to capture and the resulting series of photographs is his reaction to the infinite richness of the world.


In Pumzi, a film by Wanuri Kahiu, nature is extinct, the outside is dead and the protagonist, Asha, lives and works as a museum curator in one of the indoor communities set up by the Maitu Council. When she receives a box in the mail containing soil, she plants in it an old seed which starts to germinate instantly. Asha appeals to the Council to grant her permission to investigate the possibility of life on the outside but the Council denies her exit visa. Asha breaks out of the inside community to go into the dead and derelict outside to plant the growing seedling and possibly find life on the outside.

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Sadie Wechsler’s constructed images re-imagine landscapes, blurring historical and rational states to create alternative worlds. Some of the fantastical images depict landscapes where something is a bit off-kilter, in another a girl obscured in a shaft of light looks at the camera in an artificially perfect forest, and in another, a group of tourists stands and watches a dramatic forest fire. The images suggest photographic tropes such as stock imagery, sunsets, and holiday landscapes with unsettling, ambiguous undertones.


Ester Vonplon’s large-scale photographs are a requiem for the melting glaciers in her native Switzerland. To protect the glaciers from shrinking further they have been wrapped in giant, white reflective sheets. The photographs, however, do not depict unspoilt natural beauty, but instead the snow is filled with sediment, grit and ash, smoke-stained and grubby. The cloth started as pristine but has ripped and decayed into the melting ice of the glacier. These natural, pure monument, diseased and decaying, are mortal.


 

FORMAT was established in 2004 and organises a year-round programme of international commissions, open calls, residencies, conferences and collaborations in the UK and Internationally. The 2015 festival welcomed over 100,000 visitors from all over the world. The biennale edition incorporates over 30 of Derby’s most beautiful buildings and key landmarks including: QUAD, University of Derby, Derby Museum & Art Gallery, Derwent Valley World Heritage Sites, Market Place and satellite venues in nearby cities.

Further information and full programme on www.formatfestival.com from early 2017.

FORMAT is directed by Louise Clements, organized by QUAD and the University of Derby Supported by Arts Council England, Derby City Council and multiple partners from the UK and international origins.