Category Archives: Exhibition

Carrie Mae Weems Headlines CONTACT Photography Festival

Solo exhibition in five parts throughout Toronto, Canada

Carrie Mae Weems, Untitled, 2017. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York, NY.

Carrie Mae Weems
Opening May 3–4, 2019 with artist in attendance
Public lecture May 4, 4:00 pm
CONTACT Gallery and Justina M. Barnicke Gallery at the Art Museum at the University of Toronto
80 Spadina Avenue, Suite 205 and 7 Hart House Circle, Toronto

The Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival is thrilled to announce that renowned American artist Carrie Mae Weems will headline the twenty third edition of the citywide event, spanning the month of May 2019.

Weems’ exhibition in five parts represents the artist’s first solo exhibition in Canada. Her work will be presented in two gallery exhibitions at the Justina M. Barnicke Gallery and CONTACT Gallery, and in three major public art installations in downtown Toronto. Weems will be present for her exhibition receptions at the CONTACT Gallery (May 3, 6:00–9:00 pm) and at the Justina M. Barnicke Gallery (May 4, 6:00–8:00 pm).

The Festival’s spotlight on Weems situates her work at five distinct locations across Toronto, representing the artist’s first solo presentation in Canada. These gallery exhibitions and public installations combine pivotal streams of Weems’ practice: her sustained focus on women, which confronts issues of both repression and empowerment; and her ongoing investigation into the devastating effects of violence, especially against Black men. Weems’ exhibition at CONTACT Gallery, Blending the Blues, features photographic works spanning three decades that draw together these parallel themes.

MORE DETAILS

CONTACT is a not-for-profit dedicated to celebrating and fostering the art and profession of photography with an annual Festival in May and year-round programming in the CONTACT Gallery. CONTACT embraces an inclusive, accessible approach to the medium, and cultivates collaborations with and among artists, curators, institutions, and organizations.

Exhibition Information provided by Aperture Foundation

Aperture Foundation
547 West 27th Street, 4th floor
New York, N.Y. 10001
212.505.5555
aperture.org

 

Exhibition: Robert Kananaj Gallery – Emmanuel Monzon

Robert Kananaj Gallery is honoured to bring to the Toronto public an opportunity to experience the photographs of Emmanuel Monzon. When so much is invested in what is loud and in your face, Monzon’s “Urban Sprawl” series finds an opposing refuge in emptiness and silence. The artist invites one’s experience, conversing in a no-man’s land bordering the collision of cultures.

Urban Sprawl:  Emptiness
Emmanuel Monzon
Photographs
16 March – 4 May, 2019
Reception: Saturday 16 March 2 – 5 p.m.

Emmanuel Monzon at Robert Kananaj Gallery
Exhibition Essay by Cary Benbow

The work of Emmanuel Monzon embodies an approach of capturing the aesthetic of the banal, and grasping the everyday scene in such a way as to render it both an image and a screen for the projection of wishes and fantasies in the intermediate zone between urban and rural America. The uneasy emptiness found there results in an independent identity.

Monzon’s work falls into a space bordered traditionally and contemporarily by Giorgio de Chirico, Edward Hopper, Richard Misrach, and Michael Kenna. Formal aspects of Monzon’s images echo aspects of rendering the inanimate and the animate in a play of light and shadow, forms and patterns. Monzon’s animate elements are blatantly absent, but nonetheless, this deliberate strategy is hauntingly reminiscent of their cropping, use of foreground and concentration on visual elements which Monzon uses to make a comment on urban sprawl, and the twenty-first century tension experienced between occupied and unoccupied spaces. Kenna and Misrach both deal with the subject of landscape and explore the effects of human interaction and isolation. Their visions are achieved through long exposures, or expansive vistas, but Monzon chooses to take the baton of simplicity and clarity, and drive away with it. His automotive wanderings spur meaningful photographs in his response to the land. His quiet studies of shape, form, pattern, signage and landscape are a respite amidst the uneasy ‘non-places’, which he associates to the expansion of the urban or industrial landscape in the American natural landscape.

Monzon chose to photograph the in-between state found in the American landscape. He captures places of transition. A visual segue which gives the traveller an enigma. The limbo caught by his lens holds the viewer in check, and begs the question: am I leaving someplace or entering another? The disconcerting environment inspires him. The emptiness in both the urban landscape, and in the great American spaces. He mixes two approaches: The codes of the new topographics and the concept of ‘in-between two states’ as inspired by the anthropologist Marc Auge. These transitional non-places are like intersections or passages from one world to another, such as going from a residential area to an industrial area. Monzon includes views of tourist locations which are altered by human influence. We often find a feeling of emptiness, of visual paradox when encountering these spaces when traveling throughout the United States. By displaying structures humans built to serve their own needs, but in a rare state of absolute idleness, he creates a disconcerting environment. The visual irony of the significant impact of people upon their surrounding environment, and their notable absence in his images results in an eerie, surreal tension that stops viewers in their tracks.


Robert Kananaj Gallery
172 St Helens Avenue, Toronto ON, M6H 4A1 | 416 289-8855 | Tues-Sat 11AM-6PM

The Robert Kananaj Gallery was established in 2011 to promote and exhibit Canadian and international contemporary art. The gallery’s scope includes installation and photo-based work, as well as a strong commitment to painting and sculpture.
Director Robert Kananaj
Co-Director Roberta Laking Kananaj

For more information see RKG website at robertkananajgallery.com/

Beyond the Reach of Rivers – photography by Mandy Williams

Beyond the Reach of Rivers
Fishing Quarter Gallery, Brighton
Wednesday 1 May – Monday 6 May 2019 Open daily 11am – 5pm

Beyond Land 10_Mandy Williams
Beyond Land #10 © Mandy Williams


Beyond the Reach of Rivers is a photography exhibition by Mandy Williams that brings together work from two photographic series about the sea to the beachfront in Brighton.

Sea Level is shot in the Sussex town where she lived as a teenager and focuses on the beach shelters that line the promenade – a place to congregate and watch the sea. The photographs are taken at high tide, when the shelters are empty. Their windows are weathered and dusty and scratched by the wind. Absent of people, their presence lingers through traces of graffiti, dirt and other debris. The view of the sea through this prism produces images that are often quite abstract – the sea and the markings on the glass have equal importance in the finished photograph. Dust and neglect becomes part of the image, reinforcing the sense of melancholy which runs through many seaside towns.

In Beyond Land the photographs take place at the street, a causeway that reveals itself at low tide, stretching out towards the horizon like an umbilical cord connecting us to the sea. Started a month after the referendum result with its emphasis on Britain as an island nation, geographically and psychologically separate from Europe, the photographs show a collective march to the water’s edge. The line of people following disappearing paths out to sea not only documents our innate connection to water but can also be seen as a metaphor for the times.

Sea Level 09_Mandy Williams
Sea Level 09 © Mandy Williams

Mandy Williams is a photographer and artist who works on long-form landscape series concerned with the psychology of place and how the marks of time and human presence affect the environment. Often her photographs show a place that has been compromised – either by environmental factors or by its connection to a specific narrative.

Beyond the Reach of Rivers is her 3rd solo exhibition in the UK. Recent group exhibitions include the 209 Women exhibition at the Houses of Parliament (2018) and Open Eye Gallery, Liverpool (2019), and The Family of No Man, Cosmos, Arles (2018). She received the Photography prize at the Royal West of England Academy in 2014, 3rd place in the International Photographer of the Year Award 2017 in Landscapes: Seascapes, and work from Sea Level was shortlisted for the 2018 Hariban Award, and was an Awardee in the Julia Margaret Cameron Awards 2018.

*The title of the exhibition is taken from Loren Eiseley, an anthropologist and natural science writer whose writings frequently reference our evolutionary connection to the sea.


Contact information: Mandy Williams info@mandywilliams.com / 07817 397 747 / https://mandywilliams.com
Fishing Quarter Gallery, 201 Kings Road Arches, Brighton BN1 1NB
info@quartergallery.co.uk / 01273 723064

Spring 2019 Exhibition

Are you completing a photo degree program? What comes afterward? Career, continued education, gallery or museum work, or ???

In a few months, Wobneb Magazine will host a free juried exhibition for photographers who’ve reached the final stage of their current studies. This will be an exhibition for a photographer’s portfolio of work. Full details to follow – please share this opportunity!

Sense of Place Exhibition

The inaugural exhibition hosted by Wobneb Magazine - with essay by Rob Hudson

Wobneb Magazine wants to provide opportunities for photographers to exhibit in group online exhibitions with no entry fee. This series of exhibitions is open to any amateur or professional photographer around the globe — with the goal of providing the chance for many different people to contribute to the theme. The inaugural theme for 2018 is Sense of Place.

On some level, each photographer tries to convey an observable sense of a place within a slice of a second; hopefully transcending mere documentation of physical appearance to impart a feeling of their experience or emotions. This exhibition is fortunate to have a range of styles and methods used to address the theme. Photojournalist Louise Wateridge’s image of a Syrian refugee child playing with a pigeon is reflective of her sense of place as an observer; capturing a moment of joy within a life of hardship, and creating a strong image without being overly invasive. The work of photographer J.M. Golding is connected to specific locations and presents a spiritual and philosophical connection to the world around her. She observes and transforms the views into what exists internally as well. The landscape by Ellen Jantzen takes a step further into how an artist can capture an image or images of a place, and create new realities in her process of looking beyond surface and trying to reveal something emotional through her manipulations.

Rob Hudson is a special contributor to this exhibition. In his essay, Hudson addresses the idea of place and how photographers try ultimately to show the uniqueness and insight each person brings to the table. In addition, Hudson and photographer Al Brydon contribute images from their respective regions of Wales and England to share their sense of place with respect to their own relationship with the land.

For this exhibition, we asked photographers to consider the following: What is the social or physical landscape where you live? How do you define your sense of place in the world? A sympathetic understanding is the goal of any photographer. Each one asks the viewer to look at what they’ve captured with their camera, recall their own personal experiences, and draw meaning from the connections. We asked contributors to show how they document or interpret the world around them, and convey a sense of place using their unique visual voice. This exhibition is an exploration of that idea, our surroundings, as well as ourselves.


A Sense of Place by Rob Hudson

I’ve just returned from spending a few days in somewhere that, to me at least, has a strong sense of place — the St. David’s peninsula in the far southwest of Wales. It was one of the places in Britain where the first Christians arrived from Ireland, now memorialized in both the place’s name, and the cathedral tucked into a little valley to hide it from Viking marauders. There’s a sense of human history here that is so close to the surface and obvious in such a sparsely populated area. It seems to shine forth in a way I don’t recognize or feel about in the city I live within.

The tilted rock strata produces a long line of low hills that seem to rise up from the surrounding plane with the character of mountains. They look like leaning triangles, and that feature is carried all the way to the sea cliffs and the outlying islands. If you imagine that line of hills to be the dorsal fins of a giant subterranean whale, several miles long, then the cliffs and jutting rocks are its teeth having taken giant bites out of the coastline.

A Pembrokeshire Triangulation -05 Rob Hudson
© Rob Hudson, from ‘A Pembrokeshire Triangulation’

I could tell you these things, and create the idea of a sense of place in your mind to illustrate how the uniqueness of a place makes it stand out. Is it uniqueness, or because I’ve been visiting here since I was a boy, and have a strong emotional connection to this place? Perhaps it is because there’s a commonality of features which we recognize as having a sense of place. I can also tell you that six different people from varying ages, genders or cultures have independently described this place as having something ‘magical’ about it (and it’s a term I’d happily subscribe to myself); but this brings us no closer to explaining or identifying any features that give a sense of place.

Al Brydon 2
© Al Brydon, from the ‘None Places’ series

The poet Edward Thomas wrote the phrase, ‘Within the spaces between’, which simply sums up the connection we make to the often unappreciated places we visit — especially when we engage with making an artistic response to them. A sense of place isn’t a simple concept to understand. We all recognize it when we feel that connection, but like many emotional responses it is more difficult to explain in words. Perhaps this is because a sense of place isn’t an inherent aspect of a place’s identity at all, but something we project onto it. In short, it is a social and cultural construct. This isn’t to suggest that a sense of place is lesser because of its human roots; landscape itself is an idea, and it doesn’t exist outside the human realm. Both terms express the power place can hold over us, the depth of our emotional connection.

A Pembrokeshire Triangulation -22 Rob Hudson
© Rob Hudson, from ‘A Pembrokeshire Triangulation’

Equally important is to consider what the opposite of a sense of place might entail — what is ‘placenessness’? Placeless spaces are just as valuable in artistic expression as those that have a sense of place. A few years ago my good friend and fellow founder member of the Inside the Outside collective made a series of photographs he termed ‘None Places’. Like others engaged with a radical interpretation of landscape, Al Brydon’s ‘None Places’ are sites of freedom, which allowing for a more anarchic expression. It is arguable that after we put a frame around a photograph of a place, it ceases to be placeless because we’ve begun the process of myth making and story telling, which contribute to the creation of a sense of place. This doesn’t mean they are invalidated, they are worthy of our exploration and expression, but we should also be aware of our own contradictions. As Gertrude Stein said, “There is no there there”.

Al Brydon 3
© Al Brydon, from the ‘None Places’ series

The truth is, we make or find a sense of place if we look long and hard enough. After all, that is the job of the artist or photographer — to show others our insights. In essence we’re trying to understand and express ourselves through the medium of our relationship to place. But, and this is an important ‘but’, we don’t all share the same experiences of place. Our world is so full of imagery; only an individual’s unique response to place will stand out. That’s easier than it sounds. We have to do the legwork. It’s taken me approximately 40 years to visually consummate my love for St. David’s peninsula; I hope you’ll achieve success somewhat faster.


Ed Fetahovic
© Ed Fetahovic, Smaller Like Man, Perth, Western Australia  http://www.edfetahovicphotography.com

KathyShorr
© Kathy Shorr, Bench, Miami, FL http://www.kathyshorr.com/

Eric Moore
© Eric Moore, untitled, Saguaro National Park, Tucson, Arizona https://elmoore.myportfolio.com

Ethan Lo
© Ethan Lo, Omission, Hong Kong http://www.ethanlo.co.uk

© Juan Rodríguez Morales, Ghost World, Alcobendas, Madrid http://www.juanrodriguezmorales.com/

Emmanuel_Monzon
© Emmanuel Monzon, Urban Sprawl Emptiness, Yucca Valley, CA https://admonzon.format.com/#1

Ritam Talukdar
© Ritam Talukdar, And the journey ended, Pondicherry, India https://ritamsphotocreation.wordpress.com/

RobTM
© Rob™, Roads, Lancashire, UK http://www.robtm.co.uk

Yuriy Pavlov
© Yuriy Pavlov, Sacred place, Saint-Petersburg, https://www.ypavlov.com/

Amanda Le Kline
© Amanda Le Kline, Origins, Strausstown, Pennsylvania https://amandalekline.com/

J. M. Golding
© J. M. Golding, At the frontier of the known world, northern California http://www.jmgolding.com

Anne See
© Anne See, Walking Among Giants, Muir Woods National Monument, Mill Valley, CA https://www.instagram.com/cheeksandchubs/

© Cristóbal Carretro Cassinello, Blue Almería, Almeria, Spain http://www.cccassinello.com

Amelia Morris
© Amelia Morris, Self Portrait as a Ghost, Indianapolis, IN http://www.thanksandsorryphotos.com

catherine_slye
© Catherine Slye, Nightlight, Tucson, AZ https://www.catslye.com/

Alexandr_Polyantsev_01
© Alexandr Polyantsev, Playground, Arkhangelsk region, Russia https://polyantsev.ru

Marc Sirinsky
© Marc Sirinsky, Plane, Leesburg, VA http://www.sirinsky.com

Kristel Collison
© Kristel Collison, Noticing the Unnoticed, Northern Pennines, UK, https://instagram.com//kristel.collison

Elizabeth Virgl
© Elizabeth Virgl, Oil Refinery, Roxanna, IL

Wioleta Kaminska
© Wioleta Kaminska, Inside Silence, San Francisco, CA http://wioletakaminska.com

© Aldebarán Solares, Untitled from Umbral series, Marsella, Fr
© Aldebarán Solares, Untitled from Umbral series, Marsella, France http://www.aldebaransolares.com

David Thackwell
© David Thackwell, The Wilderness – Prologue, Hooke Park, Dorset https://dthackwell.com

Jennifer Mayhall
© Jennifer Mayhall, Rite of Passage, Cincinnati, Ohio, https://www.instagram.com/inspiration_catalyst

Piercarlo Quecchia
© Piercarlo Quecchia, The New Tomorrow Myth, Gligino Hill, Dobrljin, Bosnia & Herzegovina https://piercarloquecchia.com

Tatyana Kolbatova
© Tatyana Kolbatova, Exit to, Saint-Petersburg, Russia, https://tatyanakolbatova.com/

Ellen Jantzen
© Ellen Jantzen, Equilibrium, New Mexico,  http://www.ellenjantzen.com/

Gina Costa
© Gina Costa,Neighborhood Night Stories, South Bend,IN, http://www.ginacosta.com

Mark Sawrie
© Mark Sawrie, Twins, Joshua Tree, CA https://www.artistslashsomethingorother.com

Allan Lewis
© Allan Lewis, Gin Parlour, London, ON, allanl.com

Abhiruk Lahiri
© Abhiruk Lahiri, Urban dreams, Delhi http://clweb.csa.iisc.ernet.in/res12/abhiruk.lahiri/phaotography

Nathan Gentry
© Nathan Gentry, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania http://www.nathangentryphoto.com

Andy Mellor
© Andrew Mellor, Yesterdays, Blackpool, UK http://www.andrewmellorphotography.com

Peter Ydeen
© Peter Ydeen, Bath Construction http://peterydeen.com/

Louise Wateridge
© Louise Wateridge, Life After War -Syrian Refugee Child playing with a Pigeon in a refugee camp in Beqaa Governate, Lebanon https://www.louisewateridge.com/

Gildo Spado
© Gildo Spado, Topsy Turvy, Astoria Queens, NY http://www.gildonyc.com

Allen Morris
© Allen Morris, untitled, Milwaukee, WI http://www.allenmorrisphoto.com

Diane Fenster
© Diane Fenster, I Hear the Mermaids Singing Each to Each, Pacifica, CA http://www.lensculture.com/diane-fenster

Mirja Paljakka
© Mirja Paljakka, My place, Ylojarvi / Finland, https://mirjapaljakka.weebly.com

Nicolas Guillen
© Nicolas Guillen, Estivation, Orléans, France http://www.nguillen.com

Callie Zimmerman
© Callie Zimmerman, Turf, Fowler, IN http://www.calliezimmerman.com

Julia Ivantei-Ershova
© Julia Ivantei-Ershova, Guest, Saint Petersburg, Russia https://uabymtvk6xec.wfolio.ru/

SolaresEstefania
© Estefania Pec, Full and empty, México city https://www.instagram.com/keenkll/

Alison Benbow UK
© Alison Benbow, untitled, Liverpool, UK

Naomi Lofkin
© Naomi Lofkin, Finding Space, Dartmoor, England, https://naomilofphoto.myportfolio.com

Alex Cavalco
© Alex Cavalco, Waffle House, Milwaukee, WI http://alexcaval.co

Michael Bach
© Michael Bach, Rt. 32. Waterviliet, NY, January 2018 http.// http://www.michaelpbach.crevado.com

Devon DeVaughn
© Devon DeVaughn, RV, Eugene, OR http://www.devondevaughn.com

Martin Buday
© Martin Buday, Prophetic Kingdom, Milford, DE. 2018. http://martinbuday.com

Audrey Gottlieb
© Audrey Gottlieb, Utopia Parkway, Flushing, Queens, NY_www.audreygottlieb.com

Arthur Fields
© Arthur Fields, OBB, Vincennes, IN http://www.arthurfields.net

Tasha Lutek
© Tasha Lutek, Kitchen, Rockwood, TN http://www.tashalutek.com

 


Sense of Place, October 2018 Wobneb Magazine

Rob Hudson is one of the co-founders of Inside the Outside, a collective of landscape photographers based in the UK. He has contributed to a number of books and projects on landscape photography, and his photographs have been shown in a number of prominent exhibitions throughout the UK.
www.robhudsonlandscape.net
Twitter @RobHudsonPhoto
Instagram @robhudson_

Al Brydon’s ‘None Places’ by kind permission www.al-brydon.com.

Inside the Outside collective:
www.inside-the-outside.com
Twitter @inside_the_out
Instagram @insidetheoutsidegroup

This exhibition is also published at on Medium.com. All images are used with permission. I want to sincerely thank all the contributors and artists for sharing their work. —Cary Benbow, Publisher, Wobneb Magazine

Call for Entries – Sense of Place Exhibition

Wobneb Magazine will provide opportunities for photographers to exhibit in group online exhibitions. The exhibition is open to any amateur or professional photographer around the globe – with the goal of providing the chance for many different people to contribute to the theme. All entries will be exhibited.

Deadlines
Final deadline is 11:59pm September 30, 2018 (GMT-4:00). The exhibition will be posted online starting October 5 – October 31, 2018.

Theme
The theme for our first online exhibition is Sense of Place. What is the social or physical landscape where you live? How do you define your sense of place in the world? This does not need to be a literal translation of the term – send your images that convey a sense of place using your unique visual voice.

Photographers will be allowed ONE maximum entry per exhibition. Please do not send images that are unrelated to the theme. We reserve the right to exclude submissions if they do not fit the theme. Images can be made with any camera you choose, (large format, medium format, digital, lomo, camera phone, etc) and in any style.

Image Guidelines
Size: 72dpi, sRGB, 1000px wide
Save as .jpg
Submit Via Email

Submissions
It is FREE to enter. Send only ONE image to: wobnebmag@gmail.com
In the subject of your e-mail, type the name of the exhibition (example: SENSE OF PLACE)

© Cary Benbow, Night Crew, Greenfield, Indiana http://carybenbow.com


Send name, title, location (where you are based, or where you created the image), and link to your work (website or other): Please follow the example below EXACTLY:
©Jane Doe, The Way Home, San Antonio, TX  http://www.janedoephoto.com

(Your Name with copyright symbol, title of piece, location where it was captured, link to your site – please include http://)


If your image is sized incorrectly or the submission is incomplete, it will not be posted.

Questions? Send them to wobnebmag@gmail.com

2018 Filter Photo Festival – 10th Anniversary

PressImage
Screen Shot 2018-08-25 at 11.10.36 AM

Filter Photo announces the ​10t​h Annual Filter Photo Festival​. This four-day Festival celebrates the vibrant art community in Chicago through photography-inspired programming. ​Nearly 30 photography curators, collectors, and critics from across the country and abroad will conduct over 800 portfolio reviews with aspiring artists and photographers. The Festival will also host a variety of ​photography workshops ​exploring everything from historical processes and creative production, to professional practices and career development. Additionally, the Festival will welcome photographer, ​Mona Kuhn​, as the keynote speaker. Finally, there will be several ​artist talks and presentations​, special receptions for three juried exhibitions featuring over 80 artists at Filter Space gallery, and a ​Portfolio Walk showcasing the work of nearly 100 emerging, mid-career, and professional photographers. All midday artist talks and evening programs are free and open to the public. Portfolio reviews and workshops are paid events that require advanced registration.

The ​2018 Filter Photo Festival ​will take place September 27-30, 2018 at the ​Millennium Knickerbocker Hotel​. Additional evening events and programming will occur at several partner galleries, institutions, and organizations around Chicago.

View the full Festival schedule or visit the Festival Calendar page on the Filter Photo website:  http://filterphoto.org/

#Mass_Observation – Photo Installation at Filter Space Gallery

WortendykeK4
© Krista Wortendyke

Filter Photo is pleased to announce #Mass_Observation, a photographic installation by Krista Wortendyke, at Filter Space gallery.

#Mass_Observation is about the developing space of social media and how we use it not only as a way of collecting our own experiences, but as a way of connecting and consuming the experiences of others. Untrained observers continuously record world events, with the results posted to social media, such as Twitter and Instagram. With the rise of distrust in the major media outlets, we have turned to the non-professional, the Twittersphere, iPhone videos, and Instagram feeds for authentic and truthful windows to reality.

Wortendyke’s installation questions the aestheticization and mediation of violence in our culture by using images of racial riots, cropping them into Instagram-worthy squares, and combining them in a single space. The resulting installation mimics society’s comfort with Instagram while simultaneously calling into question the casualness with which we document and beautify events like riots.

Given the current state of racial politics and clashes in the United States, questioning and attempting to understand the role of mass media and the impact of social media in these conversations is essential. #Mass_Observation seeks to push audiences to consider their own consumption of mass and social media and the way each medium impacts the virtual spaces viewers curate for themselves.

http://filterphoto.org/portfolio/krista-wortendyke-mass_observation/

#Mass_Observation
Krista Wortendyke
Exhibition Dates: January 5 – February 3, 2018
Opening Reception: January 5 | 6pm – 9pm
Location: Filter Space 1821 W. Hubbard St., Ste. 207
Gallery Hours: Monday – Saturday | 11am – 5pm

 

Filter Space is free and open to the public.

 

 


About the Artist:

Krista Wortendyke (b. 1979, Nyack, New York) is a Chicago-based conceptual artist. She received her MFA in Photography from Columbia College in 2007. Her ongoing work examines violence through the lens of photography. Her images are a result of a constant grappling with the mediation of war and brutality both locally and globally. Her work has been exhibited at the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Schneider Gallery and Weinberg/Newton Gallery in Chicago, The Griffin Museum in Winchester, MA, and many other venues across the United States. Her work is also in the permanent collections of both the Museum of Fine Arts Houston and the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago.

Once there was there wasn’t: An exhibition of work by Svetlana Bailey

baileys2_preview
© Svetlana Bailey

Filter Photo is pleased to announce once there was there wasn’t, a solo exhibition of work by Svetlana Bailey, at Filter Space gallery.

Until the age of eight, Svetlana Bailey’s childhood summers were spent at her grandmother’s house in the Russian countryside. It was an influential period in which she discovered the world on her own and her earliest memories were formed. Sixteen years ago her grandmother passed away and now the house stands empty. For this body of work, once there was there wasn’t, Bailey returned to her grandmother’s empty house to examine those early impressions. Through this journey of returning, she was transported in time, as if opening a time capsule. Here Bailey discovered layers of image fragments captured in stories, old objects, images in albums and magazines. They pointed to the invisible marks, the impressions and mental images that remain, and perhaps for this reason — besides the dust, spider webs and the thicket of birch and cherry trees that had enjungled the outside — the house did not seem abandoned.

Using still life techniques, Bailey constructed installations within and around the house that included the objects that she found on location with photographs that she brought with her of her life after leaving Russia. She followed a similar process with images from her parents home in Germany and her own home in the US, constructing photographs that visualized times and places that are in reality far apart yet exist together psychologically. Similar to the act of carrying pictures in wallets or pendants, on coffee mugs or lock screens, displaying pictures in living rooms or as tattoos — an impulse for continuity, where separate events are rebroadcast into the present through a jumble of images.

http://filterphoto.org/portfolio/once-there-was-there-wasnt/

About the Artist:

Svetlana Bailey was born in St Petersburg in 1984, and after the fall of the Soviet Union emigrated to Germany with her family. Commencing studies at FH Dortmund, Bailey moved to Australia to complete her BFA at the College of Fine Arts in Sydney. In 2011, she undertook a residency in Beijing at the Three Shadows Photography Art Centre, which shifted the focus of her practice to China, and she has, inter alia, been photographing there since. Bailey recently graduated with an MFA in photography from the Rhode Island School of Design, and lives in New York and Sydney.

once there was there wasn’t — Svetlana Bailey

Exhibition Dates: December 1 — December 30, 2017
Opening Reception: December 1 | 6pm — 9pm
Location: Filter Space 1821 W. Hubbard St., Ste. 207
Gallery Hours: Monday — Saturday | 11am — 5pm

Filter Space is free and open to the public.

Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2017

Featuring works from Dana Lixenberg, Sophie Calle, Awoiska van der Molen, Taiyo Onorato and Nico Krebs

Exhibition on view: November 16, 2017–January 11, 2018
Opening reception: Wednesday, November 15, 7:00–8:30 p.m.

Aperture Foundation, in collaboration with The Photographers’ Gallery and the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation, is pleased to present the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2017, featuring works from the shortlisted artists: Sophie Calle, Awoiska van der Molen, duo Taiyo Onorato and Nico Krebs, and this year’s winner, Dana Lixenberg, who was awarded the prize, worth £30,000 GBP, in May of this year. This marks the first exhibition of the prize in the United States.

The twentieth iteration of the prize, one of the most prestigious international arts awards, celebrates established photographic narratives alongside experimental and conceptual approaches to documentary, landscape, and portraiture. The four finalists investigate questions of truth and fiction, doubt and certainty, what constitutes the real and ideal, and the relationship between observer and the observed.

The opening of this exhibition at The Photographers’ Gallery in London, began an international tour of the show that went on to exhibit at the Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt am Main, and subsequently at Aperture Foundation, marking the first exhibition in the United States of this prize. This year’s exhibition is curated by Anna Dannemann, Curator, The Photographer’s Gallery.



Featured Artists

Dana Lixenberg (b. 1964, the Netherlands) won for her publication Imperial Courts (Roma, 2015). In 1992, Dana Lixenberg traveled to South Central Los Angeles for a magazine story on the riots that erupted following the verdict in the Rodney King trial. What she encountered inspired her to revisit the area, and led her to the community of the Imperial Courts housing project in Watts. Returning countless times over the following twenty-two years, Lixenberg gradually created a collaborative portrait of the changing face of this community. Over the years, some in the community were killed, while others disappeared or went to jail, and others, once children in early photographs, grew up and had children of their own. In this way, Imperial Courts constitutes a complex and evocative record of the passage of time in an underserved community.


Sophie Calle (b. 1953, France) was nominated for her publication My All (Actes Sud, 2016), which finds the artist experimenting with yet another medium: the postcard set. Taking stock of her entire oeuvre, this set of postcards functions as a beautiful portfolio of Calle’s work, as well as a new investigation of it, in an appropriately nomadic format. Over the past thirty years, Sophie Calle has invited strangers to sleep in her bed, followed a man through the streets of Paris to Venice, hired a detective to spy on her before providing a report of her day, and asked blind people to tell her about the final image they remember. In her practice, she has orchestrated small moments of life, establishing a game, then setting its rules for herself and for others.

Calle’s Exquisite Pain is an installation in two parts that unfolds stories of devastating personal experiences as a means of reexamining and, ultimately, exorcising grief. The first part of the project presents Calle’s journey preceding “the unhappiest moment of [her] whole life,” told through collected photos and ephemera of ninety-two days that the artist saw as a countdown to romantic rejection. Each photograph or document is stamped with a number indicating the remaining amount of “days until unhappiness.” The second part of the exhibition pairs Calle’s story, told repeatedly from several different angles, with others’ recollections of their own pain and heartache. Through recursive recitation and empathy, the project explores the universality of pain and resilience.


Awoiska van der Molen (b. 1972, the Netherlands) was nominated for her exhibition Blanco at Foam, Amsterdam (January 22–April 3, 2016). Van der Molen creates black-and-white, abstracted images that revitalize the genre of landscape photography. Spending long periods of time in solitude and silence in foreign landscapes, from Japan to Norway to Crete, she explores the identity of the place, allowing it to impress upon her its specific emotional and physical qualities and her personal experience within it. With this intuitive approach, Van der Molen aims to find a pure form of representing her surroundings, by focusing on the essential elements in and around her. Her work questions how natural and man-made environments are commonly represented and interacted with.


Taiyo Onorato and Nico Krebs (both b. 1979, Switzerland) were nominated for their exhibition EURASIA at Fotomuseum Winterthur (October 24, 2015–March 14, 2016). EURASIA playfully draws on the iconography of the road trip, constructing experiences drawn from memory and imagination. Onorato and Krebs’s journey begins in Switzerland, continues through the Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, and Russia, and ends in Mongolia. Throughout their travels the duo encounters landscapes and people in a state of ongoing transition from ancient traditions and post-Communist structures to modernity and the formation of an independent identity. Using a mix of analogue media and techniques including 16 mm films, large-format plate cameras, and installation-based interventions, Onorato and Krebs compose a narrative that is as much fiction as documentation.

 


About the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize

Founded in 1997 by The Photographers’ Gallery, and now in its twentieth year, the Prize has become one of the most prestigious international arts awards and has launched and established the careers of many photographers over the years. The Gallery has been collaborating with Deutsche Börse Group as title sponsors since 2005. In 2015 the Prize was retitled as the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize following the establishment of the foundation as a non- profit organization dedicated to the collection, exhibition and promotion of contemporary photography. Past winners include Trevor Paglen, Paul Graham, Juergen Teller, Rineke Dijkstra, Richard Billingham, John Stezaker, and Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin. A jury including Susan Bright, curator; Pieter Hugo, artist; Karolina Ziębińska-Lewandowska, curator of photography at Centre Pompidou, Paris; Anne-Marie Beckmann, director, Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation; and Brett Rogers, director, The Photographers’ Gallery, as the non-voting chair, selected the four finalists featured in 2017.

The Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation is a Frankfurt-based non-profit organization. The foundation’s activities focus on collecting, exhibiting and promoting contemporary photography.
For more information, please visit www.deutscheboersephotographyfoundation.org.


The Photographers’ Gallery opened in 1971 in Great Newport Street, London, as the UK’s first independent gallery devoted to photography. It was the first public gallery in the UK to exhibit many key names in international photography.
For more information, please visit www.thephotographersgallery.org.uk 


Aperture Foundation was created in 1952 by photographers and writers. The not-for-profit foundation, connects the photo community and its audiences with the most inspiring work, the sharpest ideas, and with each other — in print, in person, and online.
For more information, please visit aperture.org.


This story was also published on Medium