Out of the Ordinary, Vol. 2: A Journey Through Everyday Scotland

A Personal Portrait of Everyday Scotland

The second volume of Out of the Ordinary by Iain Sarjeant is a continuation of the project he has been working on for a number of years. The project, and two books thus far, has developed from the approach of Sarjeant’s spontaneous wandering, exploring, discovering, and observing. “The series explores the kind of places that most of us walk or drive past every day,” says Sarjeant, “without really noticing – places where the infrastructure of human habitation interacts with the natural environment. These are dynamic landscapes, constantly being altered, and part of the fascination for me is the element of chance involved in the photographs – coming across scenes that may look very different the following week or month.”

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As with Volume 1, this new book captures scenes of the land Sarjeant encounters across Scotland. The witty interplay between geometric shapes, colors or textures is a strong part of his work. His body of work includes images that feature vehicles in all manner of use and function (or disfunction), buildings both commercial and residential, markings on pavement, graffiti, shadows and shipping containers. From a visual standpoint, Sarjeant takes advantage of Scottish overcast skies to give extra punch to the color that is either featured or included in the scenes. He compresses the space to heighten the sense of rhythm or repetition of shapes, or knows when to pull back to include more of the scene to set the stage. He has valuable use of line and it draws the viewer through the images, and the layout of the overall book as well. Artful placement of the images in sequencing this book make smart visual connections. Power lines and playground structures are connected visually, as are fence rows and street markings, or old growth hedges and growing saplings. Sarjeant’s use of visual association and interplay are used to their best again in this book. Out of the Ordinary, Vol. 2 is a joy to view and admire the craft of creating a multi-volume series of photography books.

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Over several years, Another Place Press has been quietly building a cache of wonderful photo books dealing with the subject of the land, and peoples’ relationship and interaction with it.  Out of the Ordinary is one of the books that anchors this theme. The third and final volume of Out of the Ordinary will tentatively publish at some time in 2018. 


Iain Sarjeant is the founder and editor of Another Place, and Another Place Press which showcases contemporary landscape photography. He has worked with the photo collective, Documenting Britain, and works as a stock photographer.
To purchase a copy of Out of the Ordinary, Vol. 2 – please visit Another Place Press.

For more information, or to view Sarjeant’s personal work; please visit these sites:

http://iainsarjeant.tumblr.com/
http://www.iainsarjeant.co.uk/
http://www.iainsarjeant.com/


This is an edited version of the piece originally published in F-Stop Magazine in January, 2018.

The Kingdom by Stéphane Levoué

Surreal and mysterious portraits and places in Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom

In 2010, French photographer Stéphane Lavoué discovered a special landscape in the United States, called Northeast Kingdom. It is located along the border to Canada in the northeast corner of Vermont, comprising Essex, Orleans and Caledonia counties. This beautiful, rugged, remote area has a population of roughly 65,000 people. Lavoué’s series and book, The Kingdom is a personal tribute.

When Stéphane Lavoué and his family first came to the Northeast Kingdom, he immediately felt he found a very special place. In the beginning, he wanted to make a body of work like a journalistic investigation. Levoué started his series with this idea in mind, but the project and the resulting book are far more than photo reportage. His images transcend into narrative fiction, even if all the people and places are based on a real place.

I have the habit of browsing through a book from front to back, then working my way back toward the front again. As a result, I came across the accompanying text at the back of the book and read the account right after my first pass through the book. The story is about a woman traveling to the Kingdom. She is searching for her brother who has been absent for many years. Could all the people and places Levoué captured be evidence of this story?

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The French writer and journalist, Judith Perrignon, was asked to write her short piece to accompany the images. Her text was written after the photo series was completed, so her story is a mix of invented memories and fictional events.  With or without knowing this, an entirely new layer of meaning is applied when viewing the book with her text in mind. Before I knew the text was fictional, the portraits and scenes I had first encountered had me retracing my steps; wondering who and where Levoué had chosen to photograph because of their importance in the story. Levoué’s images have a timeless and surreal quality – natural lighting makes a man waring a hairnet and an Army graphic t-shirt look like a renaissance painting, and scenes of The Museum of Everyday Life could easily be mistaken for a setting from Twin Peaks, or a Wes Anderson film.

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In addition to the striking images and text, the book itself feels great to hold. The embossed cover feels like leather, the printed end sheets of the book feature a map of the Northeast Kingdom; which invokes the idea that one is holding a personal journal, or an artifact that is a part of the mystery and the story within. The mystery deepened each time I went back to the images and re-read the text. Levoué’s world in The Kingdom had me revisit the work multiple times; and left me with more wonderful questions than answers.

 

Photos by Stéphane Lavoué, with text by Judith Perrignon
Graphic design by l’atelier 25
French & English
96 pages
40 pictures
170×240 mm
Munken lynx 170 gr & woodstock grigio 110 gr embossed hard cover
ISBN 978-2-9552412-4-0
2017 first edition

The Kingdom is published by éditions 77 – please visit their website to order a copy here. To see more work by Stéphane Levoué, please visit his website.


This is an edited version of the review first published in F-Stop Magazine in January, 2018.

#Mass_Observation – Photo Installation at Filter Space Gallery

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© Krista Wortendyke

Filter Photo is pleased to announce #Mass_Observation, a photographic installation by Krista Wortendyke, at Filter Space gallery.

#Mass_Observation is about the developing space of social media and how we use it not only as a way of collecting our own experiences, but as a way of connecting and consuming the experiences of others. Untrained observers continuously record world events, with the results posted to social media, such as Twitter and Instagram. With the rise of distrust in the major media outlets, we have turned to the non-professional, the Twittersphere, iPhone videos, and Instagram feeds for authentic and truthful windows to reality.

Wortendyke’s installation questions the aestheticization and mediation of violence in our culture by using images of racial riots, cropping them into Instagram-worthy squares, and combining them in a single space. The resulting installation mimics society’s comfort with Instagram while simultaneously calling into question the casualness with which we document and beautify events like riots.

Given the current state of racial politics and clashes in the United States, questioning and attempting to understand the role of mass media and the impact of social media in these conversations is essential. #Mass_Observation seeks to push audiences to consider their own consumption of mass and social media and the way each medium impacts the virtual spaces viewers curate for themselves.

http://filterphoto.org/portfolio/krista-wortendyke-mass_observation/

#Mass_Observation
Krista Wortendyke
Exhibition Dates: January 5 – February 3, 2018
Opening Reception: January 5 | 6pm – 9pm
Location: Filter Space 1821 W. Hubbard St., Ste. 207
Gallery Hours: Monday – Saturday | 11am – 5pm

 

Filter Space is free and open to the public.

 

 


About the Artist:

Krista Wortendyke (b. 1979, Nyack, New York) is a Chicago-based conceptual artist. She received her MFA in Photography from Columbia College in 2007. Her ongoing work examines violence through the lens of photography. Her images are a result of a constant grappling with the mediation of war and brutality both locally and globally. Her work has been exhibited at the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Schneider Gallery and Weinberg/Newton Gallery in Chicago, The Griffin Museum in Winchester, MA, and many other venues across the United States. Her work is also in the permanent collections of both the Museum of Fine Arts Houston and the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago.

Call for Entries – Context 2018 :: Filter Photo

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Only 2 days left to submit to Context 2018, the fourth annual spring open call for photography. This year the exhibition will be juried by April M. Watson, Curator of Photography at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

This annual open call for work celebrates the multiple perspectives and creative voices of contemporary photography.  Open to all lens-based work, this exhibition is always exciting and filled with a great variety of artists.  Scroll down for more details about the call and submit your work today!

Context 2018

Context 2018 will open March 16, 2018, at Filter Space and will be open through April 28. A juror’s choice award and an honorable mention will be awarded.

All types of photographic and lens-based work will be considered, including short videos.

The cost to submit to Context 2018 is $30.00 for up to five entries. The juror’s choice award comes with a $500 cash prize.

Open Theme:

Juror and curator April M. Watson will consider all types of photographic work for this fourth annual survey exhibition of contemporary photography.  This open theme allows for the widest understanding of the medium and current photographic practices. She is open to all interpretations and will accept photography and video.
Important Dates:

January 14 – Submissions are due

Late January – Entrants are notified of juror’s decision

March 9 – Accepted work must arrive at the gallery

March 16th, 6 – 9 pm – Artists’ Reception and Exhibition Opens

April 28 – Exhibition Closes


About the Juror

April M. Watson is curator of photography at the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, MO. She joined the museum in 2007, and since then has curated and co-curated numerous exhibitions from the permanent Hallmark Photography collection, including Heartland: The Photographs of Terry Evans, a career retrospective of the artist; Through the Lens: Visions of African-American Experience, 1950-1970; American Soldier; About Face: Contemporary PortraitureTime in the West: Photographs by Mark Klett & Byron Wolfe and Mark Ruwedel; and Human/Nature: Recent European Landscape Photography. In fall 2013, Watson served as the photography curator for Impressionist France: Visions of Nation from Le Gray to Monet, an exhibition co-organized with the Saint Louis Art Museum. She is also co-curator of the upcoming retrospective Eugene Richards: The Run-On of Time (2017), a show co-organized with Lisa Hostetler of the George Eastman Museum, Rochester, NY. Forthcoming projects include an exhibition of Gordon Parks’s photographs of Muhammad Ali, in collaboration with the Gordon Parks Foundation. Watson has contributed writing and scholarship to numerous exhibitions and catalogues, including Stories from the Camera (2016) and The Art of Frederick Sommer: Photography, Drawing, Collage (2005). Watson holds a PhD in Art History from the University of Kansas, Lawrence; an MA in Art and Art History from the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; and a BFA from Alfred University, NY.