Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2017

Featuring works from Dana Lixenberg, Sophie Calle, Awoiska van der Molen, Taiyo Onorato and Nico Krebs

Exhibition on view: November 16, 2017–January 11, 2018
Opening reception: Wednesday, November 15, 7:00–8:30 p.m.

Aperture Foundation, in collaboration with The Photographers’ Gallery and the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation, is pleased to present the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize 2017, featuring works from the shortlisted artists: Sophie Calle, Awoiska van der Molen, duo Taiyo Onorato and Nico Krebs, and this year’s winner, Dana Lixenberg, who was awarded the prize, worth £30,000 GBP, in May of this year. This marks the first exhibition of the prize in the United States.

The twentieth iteration of the prize, one of the most prestigious international arts awards, celebrates established photographic narratives alongside experimental and conceptual approaches to documentary, landscape, and portraiture. The four finalists investigate questions of truth and fiction, doubt and certainty, what constitutes the real and ideal, and the relationship between observer and the observed.

The opening of this exhibition at The Photographers’ Gallery in London, began an international tour of the show that went on to exhibit at the Museum für Moderne Kunst Frankfurt am Main, and subsequently at Aperture Foundation, marking the first exhibition in the United States of this prize. This year’s exhibition is curated by Anna Dannemann, Curator, The Photographer’s Gallery.



Featured Artists

Dana Lixenberg (b. 1964, the Netherlands) won for her publication Imperial Courts (Roma, 2015). In 1992, Dana Lixenberg traveled to South Central Los Angeles for a magazine story on the riots that erupted following the verdict in the Rodney King trial. What she encountered inspired her to revisit the area, and led her to the community of the Imperial Courts housing project in Watts. Returning countless times over the following twenty-two years, Lixenberg gradually created a collaborative portrait of the changing face of this community. Over the years, some in the community were killed, while others disappeared or went to jail, and others, once children in early photographs, grew up and had children of their own. In this way, Imperial Courts constitutes a complex and evocative record of the passage of time in an underserved community.


Sophie Calle (b. 1953, France) was nominated for her publication My All (Actes Sud, 2016), which finds the artist experimenting with yet another medium: the postcard set. Taking stock of her entire oeuvre, this set of postcards functions as a beautiful portfolio of Calle’s work, as well as a new investigation of it, in an appropriately nomadic format. Over the past thirty years, Sophie Calle has invited strangers to sleep in her bed, followed a man through the streets of Paris to Venice, hired a detective to spy on her before providing a report of her day, and asked blind people to tell her about the final image they remember. In her practice, she has orchestrated small moments of life, establishing a game, then setting its rules for herself and for others.

Calle’s Exquisite Pain is an installation in two parts that unfolds stories of devastating personal experiences as a means of reexamining and, ultimately, exorcising grief. The first part of the project presents Calle’s journey preceding “the unhappiest moment of [her] whole life,” told through collected photos and ephemera of ninety-two days that the artist saw as a countdown to romantic rejection. Each photograph or document is stamped with a number indicating the remaining amount of “days until unhappiness.” The second part of the exhibition pairs Calle’s story, told repeatedly from several different angles, with others’ recollections of their own pain and heartache. Through recursive recitation and empathy, the project explores the universality of pain and resilience.


Awoiska van der Molen (b. 1972, the Netherlands) was nominated for her exhibition Blanco at Foam, Amsterdam (January 22–April 3, 2016). Van der Molen creates black-and-white, abstracted images that revitalize the genre of landscape photography. Spending long periods of time in solitude and silence in foreign landscapes, from Japan to Norway to Crete, she explores the identity of the place, allowing it to impress upon her its specific emotional and physical qualities and her personal experience within it. With this intuitive approach, Van der Molen aims to find a pure form of representing her surroundings, by focusing on the essential elements in and around her. Her work questions how natural and man-made environments are commonly represented and interacted with.


Taiyo Onorato and Nico Krebs (both b. 1979, Switzerland) were nominated for their exhibition EURASIA at Fotomuseum Winterthur (October 24, 2015–March 14, 2016). EURASIA playfully draws on the iconography of the road trip, constructing experiences drawn from memory and imagination. Onorato and Krebs’s journey begins in Switzerland, continues through the Ukraine, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, and Russia, and ends in Mongolia. Throughout their travels the duo encounters landscapes and people in a state of ongoing transition from ancient traditions and post-Communist structures to modernity and the formation of an independent identity. Using a mix of analogue media and techniques including 16 mm films, large-format plate cameras, and installation-based interventions, Onorato and Krebs compose a narrative that is as much fiction as documentation.

 


About the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize

Founded in 1997 by The Photographers’ Gallery, and now in its twentieth year, the Prize has become one of the most prestigious international arts awards and has launched and established the careers of many photographers over the years. The Gallery has been collaborating with Deutsche Börse Group as title sponsors since 2005. In 2015 the Prize was retitled as the Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation Prize following the establishment of the foundation as a non- profit organization dedicated to the collection, exhibition and promotion of contemporary photography. Past winners include Trevor Paglen, Paul Graham, Juergen Teller, Rineke Dijkstra, Richard Billingham, John Stezaker, and Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin. A jury including Susan Bright, curator; Pieter Hugo, artist; Karolina Ziębińska-Lewandowska, curator of photography at Centre Pompidou, Paris; Anne-Marie Beckmann, director, Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation; and Brett Rogers, director, The Photographers’ Gallery, as the non-voting chair, selected the four finalists featured in 2017.

The Deutsche Börse Photography Foundation is a Frankfurt-based non-profit organization. The foundation’s activities focus on collecting, exhibiting and promoting contemporary photography.
For more information, please visit www.deutscheboersephotographyfoundation.org.


The Photographers’ Gallery opened in 1971 in Great Newport Street, London, as the UK’s first independent gallery devoted to photography. It was the first public gallery in the UK to exhibit many key names in international photography.
For more information, please visit www.thephotographersgallery.org.uk 


Aperture Foundation was created in 1952 by photographers and writers. The not-for-profit foundation, connects the photo community and its audiences with the most inspiring work, the sharpest ideas, and with each other — in print, in person, and online.
For more information, please visit aperture.org.


This story was also published on Medium

In the Country of Stones by Nicolas Blandin

Poetic visual narrative of Armenia

© Nicolas Blandin www.nicolasblandin.com

Busy lives being what they are — I did not have the opportunity to sit down with In the Country of Stones when it published in June of 2017. My copy arrived, and time slipped by. Shame on me. Nicolas Blandin’s book is a wonderful collection of images made when he travelled to Armenia in 2013–2014 after being captivated by the land and its people on a previous visit.

The landscapes Blandin captured are beautiful in their stillness. The layers of history, memories and culture appear in icons made visible. Telephone poles, highway ruins, and ancient carvings all evoke an ancient Christian past, and the Soviet government that ruled there for over 70 years is recognized as well. Both exist, at least visually, in a harmony knit together by the people of Armenia. Blandin comments on this aspect of the people in the book: “We had heard about the legendary Armenian hospitality, but we were still humbled by the level of openness and generosity we encountered. During those three weeks on the road we had the strange feeling that we had reunited with distant relatives…”

© Nicolas Blandin www.nicolasblandin.com

© Nicolas Blandin www.nicolasblandin.com

The mix of images in the book include almost as many portraits as images of the land itself. Yet I undoubtedly consider the book to be about Blandin’s journey to this raw, poetically beautiful place. The placement of the images within the book are such that one image leads the viewer into the next with a feeling of wonder, and time seems to fold back and forth on itself. A portrait of teenage boys wearing contemporary clothes is juxtaposed with an image of a house interior with a metal stove that could easily be from the early 20th century. Massive Soviet brutalist architecture follows an interior photo of a monastery from the 9th century complete with early Christian iconography. And each person shown in the book gazes directly at the camera, and thus right at the viewer — hinting at the openness and familiarity Blandin felt.

© Nicolas Blandin www.nicolasblandin.com

© Nicolas Blandin www.nicolasblandin.com

© Nicolas Blandin www.nicolasblandin.com

Nicolas_Blandin_8

© Nicolas Blandin www.nicolasblandin.com

The book sold out its first edition 150 copy print run, not surprisingly. Much like many of the other editions published by Another Place Press, the book’s size is very personal in nature; lending to a meaningful interaction between the images and the viewer. The photos are printed beautifully on uncoated paper, which gives them a warmth and softness without sacrificing clarity.

© Nicolas Blandin www.nicolasblandin.com

Nicolas_Blandin_12

© Nicolas Blandin www.nicolasblandin.com

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Blandin speaks to the backstory of the project, as well as the historic narrative of Armenia and how it frames his work in those contexts. He closes his statement in the book by saying, “The images in this book are the result of a personal journey. They are partial, subjective, selective, even oblique. They do not amount to a definitive vision of the country. How could they even presume to record a nation in such a state of flux? In my photographs, I am seeking to tell my own story, as well as the stories of others, as honestly as I can. Rather than documenting the history and the landscape, my approach to both is rather more poetic and lyrical. And yet, to borrow Jocelyn Lee’s words, photographs, unlike paintings or drawings, remain “mysterious but irrefutable anchors to a real event in space and time.”

Nicolas_Blandin_Book_cover

In the County of Stones — Nicolas Blandin

76 pp / 150 x 190mm
Perfect Bound
Fedrigoni & GF Smith papers:
350gsm Colorplan cover
170gsm Uncoated text
Edition of 150
APP011
ISBN 978–1–9997424–0–9

 


Nicolas Blandin is a self-taught French photographer based in Annecy, France. Winner of the 2017 Feature Shoot Emerging Photography Awards, his work has been featured in various publications both printed and online. Besides freelancing for editorial and commercial clients, Nicolas is working on several long-term personal projects. His first book entitled “In the Country of Stones” was published by Another Place Press in June 2017.

Feel free to get in touch for commissions, collaborations, print inquiries or just to say hi.

Another Place Press is a small independent publisher interested in contemporary photography that explores landscape in the widest sense, covering themes which include land, place, journey, city and environment — from the remotest corners of the globe to the centre of the largest cities. Iain Sarjeant is the founder and editor of Another Place, and Another Place Press.

 

 

ObjectImage by Sarah Tulloch

New narratives born from a collection of personal and public images

ObjectImage introduces British artist Sarah Tulloch’s idiosyncratic approach to working with the photographic image. Tulloch uses photo collections left by her grandfather and daily newspaper imagery to explore themes that reflect on our shared habits of consuming photographic media. From the social history of documenting family to the juxtaposition of recycled media imagery she probes and questions both object and image to create new and beguiling works. 

Chavez-Kate Moss Queen Of Fashion
Honey Boo Boo Landscape

The book is laid out and composed to give Tulloch’s work deserved attention. The placement of both full images and details throughout the book allows the reader to view the works at various distances – and really get a chance to appreciate the craft and care taken to artfully construct these ‘new’ images. Shaggy fibers from rough cut edges and the smooth scalloped borders of the original prints contrast the other; layers of some collages are distinctly apparent and lend a tactile depth to the object.

“You have to have that point where the image
is released from its original use—value for it to become something else and for that imaginative process to do its work.”
Sarah Tulloch

Plant Boy

In Faultline, and the subsequent Cut Series and Postcards, Tulloch’s re-works her grandfather’s collection of photographs, slides and cine films. She describes her Cut Series “as an investigation into the slippery nature of memory and the photographs mediation between worlds that are obfuscated from one another. The material fabric of the photograph and its’ possibilities for ‘re formation’ are the material of my working practice.” Her photomontages allow her to re-focus the media, re-compose the image and ultimately re-find and re-purpose the photographic subject. 

from Postcard Series, Boy Dog
from Postcard Series, Boy Dog – Detail

Tulloch’s new work Newspaper Heads continues themes of transience and entropy but shifts the stage to public and contemporary events. Tulloch was drawn to the unexpected juxtapositions of subject matter in daily newspapers; overleaf from images of human tragedy are adverts for a new car. She reflects and re-presents this image culture and as with earlier work re-defines the photographic matter in the process. 

Leaning Hand
Faultline

So many artists/photographers are creating work by mining the digital archives of the internet – whether it be appropriated news or mass media images, curated flotsam and jetsam of personal photographs online, or the like. Tulloch’s personally inspired work (she inherited her grandfather’s  extensive collection of photographs) in ObjectImage was made with thoughtful intent. Unlike the lucky happenstance of found photos that incidentally speak to an artist’s tastes and oeuvre – Tulloch’s cuts are not random; rather there is a clear choice to show, or not show, elements of the original images. The physical manipulation and technique of collage are not new, but her work feels fresh. The curation of her reinvented images, along with the accompanying introduction by curator and writer Matthew Hearn, and the interview with photographer  Marjolaine Ryley, really gives the reader a sense of Tulloch’s foundation and philosophy behind her creative process, and the images carry her new narratives forward.

ObjectImage by Sarah Tulloch
128 pages; 7 x 9 ½  inches (17.7 x 24 cm)
ISBN-13: 9781942084372


Sarah Tulloch holds a First Class honors degree from the Bristol School of Art and a Design and Distinction, Master of Fine Arts from Newcastle University. She concentrates on a close-range investigation of found photographs as both objects with specific material qualities and images in themselves. Her book, published by Daylight Books, is supported by the Arts Council England. Tulloch has exhibited in the UK and internationally, including Plus Arts Projects in London, Motorcade/FlashParade in Bristol, Baltic 39 in Newcastle upon Tyne, and Bergby Konst Centre, Sweden. Tulloch lives and works in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

For more information about Sarah Tulloch, please visit: www.sarahtulloch.co.uk

To order a copy of ObjectImage, visit Daylight Books here

Art Through the Lens 2017 – The Yeiser Art Center | Eliot Dudik – Juror

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Art Through the Lens 2017

Dates: October 14 – November 25, 2017
Reception: Friday October 13th from 5-7pm  

The Yeiser Art Center (YAC) is pleased to be hosting the annual international juried photography arts competition, Art Through the Lens. Originating in 1975 as the Paducah Summer Festival Photo Competition, Paducah Photo has grown from a fledgling contest into an international juried exhibition. Over the past 40 years, this exhibition has become one of the Mid-South’s most prestigious annual photographic events. To honor its history, the exhibition now exists in two parts: the International Show which features the juror’s selection and the Regional Showcase chosen by second juror.

“It was my great pleasure to be this year’s juror for the Art Through the Lens exhibition at the Yeiser Art Center,” said Eliot Dudik. “The first juried exhibition I applied to and was selected for was Paducah Photo 2009, which I believe was the older version of Art Through the Lens, so this exhibition means a lot to me as it was a springboard of sorts for my own work. Jurying an art exhibition is no easy task, especially one with 621 exceptional entries. There were certainly photographs that didn’t ultimately make the cut that I had a very difficult time letting go. Selecting images for an exhibition is by no means black & white. We all have our own tastes and interests. My interests in photography are quite broad, as are my interests in music, film, and literature, which made the selection process for this lens-based art exhibition even more difficult. I do, however, have a tendency toward material and process, experimentation, risk, ideas, nuance, and heart. I believe the selections made for the 2017 Art Through the Lens exhibition carry all of these things, and I hope you’ll enjoy interacting with them as I did.”

This year’s opening reception will be held on Friday October 13th from 5-7pm, and will include light refreshments and the announcement of awards. The reception is free and open to the public. After the reception, there will be a $5 admission to see the exhibition. Proceeds support the Yeiser Art Center’s mission to bring exceptional arts educational programming to Paducah. YAC Members and guests under 13 years of age always enter free of charge. 


Located in downtown Paducah, the Yeiser Art Center is a non-profit visual arts organization celebrating sixty years (1957 – 2017) of serving the community through exhibitions and education throughout the Tri-State Region. The Yeiser Art Center is wheelchair accessible.   

Hours of Operation:
Tuesday – Saturday, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Admission: $5 for non members, YAC members and children under 13 free.
For questions, please email the YAC at office@theyeiser.org or call 270-442-2453.  Visit theyeiser.org for more info on upcoming events.

Nicolò Sertorio – Once We Were Here

33W 426300mE 7550298mN

Filter Photo is pleased to announce Once We Were Here, a solo exhibition of work by Nicolò Sertorio, at Filter Space gallery.

Nicolò Sertorio considers himself privileged: white, male, educated, healthy, living in the Western world. He is, however, admittedly part of a ‘disenchanted generation’ born after WWII when globalization seemed like a great idea, a path towards unification, only to be awakened to a hard reality of inequality and environmental abuse. Contemporary media is filled with alarming news: ice melting, fresh water contamination, overpopulation, corporate greed, food poisoning, oil dependency, and wealth inequality, among other things. It seems the world has lost its mystery to become the playground of the very few at the expense of the many. Nicolò Sertorio’s photographs address the resulting sense of powerlessness that has left communities disenfranchised, resulting in a lack of social or environmental accountability.

Presented as a hypothetical archeological study on the nature of co-existence, Sertorio’s series, Once We Were Here, presents the viewer with a world where humanity’s need for insatiable consumption has led it to the ultimate consumption: the consumption of the self. We are shown a world where the selfishness of humanity has disappeared yet nature remains in its solemnness. Nature has endured and overcome the weight of humanity’s selfish behaviors and we are reunited with nature’s beauty and mystery.

http://filterphoto.org/portfolio/once-we-were-here/

Nicolò Sertorio is an artist based in Oakland, CA (born in Italy). He grew up influenced by both European and American culture in a family with a long tradition in academia, arts, and science. This multicultural and scientific upbringing influenced him to be both analytical and explorative.  Traveling extensively and living in many countries from an early age has left him with a unique combination of European sensibility and complex, and at times conflicting, worldviews.

Once We Were Here
Nicolò Sertorio
Exhibition Dates: November 3 – November 25, 2017
Opening Reception: November 3 | 6pm – 9pm
Location: Filter Space 1821 W. Hubbard St., Ste. 207, Chicago, IL 60622
Gallery Hours: Monday – Saturday | 11am – 5pm

Filter Space is free and open to the public.